Posts

SESAMOIDITIS – What is it???

Sesamoiditis

What is it?

There are two small bones under the hallux (big toe) of both feet called sesamoids. These bones are designed to create a mechanical advantage for the muscles, take some weightbearing and elevate the metatarsal bone off the ground. These bones are relatively small and due to their location, can be easily overloaded. This can occur from an acute injury or from a chronic overloading.  

Symptoms

  • Painful to touch
  • Painful to load the area or walk on
  • Reduced range of motion of the hallux 
  • Swelling of the area

 

Treatment 

  • Offloading
    • Tape
    • Post op shoe
    • Orthotics
  • Activity modifications
  • Footwear recommendations
  • Medical imaging
  • Biomechanical assessment
  • THOR low level laser therapy

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – check out our latest blog for treatment recommendations

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from high forces at the end range of motion of a joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces.

Different sports will carry higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing and when pain started
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
  • Activity modification

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY – PLANTAR FASCIITIS – PLANTAR HEEL PAIN

Plantar fasciopathy

  • Also known as plantar fasciitis, plantar fasciosis or plantar heel pain.

Refers to dysfunction of the plantar fascia (or plantar aponeurosis) under the foot. It is a connective tissue which connects the heel to the toes. The tissue may thicken, tear or become inflamed from overloading.

Symptoms

  • Pain under the arch of the foot. Most often ‘first step’ pain which occurs in the morning or after rest.
  • Can occur gradually over time or from an acute injury

Risk factors

  • High BMI
  • Reduced ankle range of motion
  • Foot structure
  • Occupation: jobs involving a lot of time standing

Treatment

  • Biomechanical assessment
  • Offloading with taping or orthotics
  • Footwear recommendations
  • Pain relief 
  • Activity modifications
  • THOR low level laser treatment to help reduce inflammation
  • Stretches

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

‘W’ SITTING – WHAT IS IT & WHY SHOULD I CORRECT IT?

W-Sitting

‘W-Sitting’ is where a child sits on the floor with their knees out forward and their legs splayed outwards to replicate a ‘W’. During their young age, sitting positions and activities will play a large role in the development of their lower limbs. ‘W-sitting’ particularly affects the hips and surrounding soft tissue such as ligaments and muscles.

This position encourages internal rotation of the hips and loosening these soft tissues to maintain this posture. These changes may also alter the child’s walking pattern. Internally rotated hips may result in a ‘pigeon-toed’ or with ‘knees pointing inwards’ while the child walks. The child may experience clumsiness, fatigue or lack of confidence in their walking and during sports. 

What can we do about it?
Encourage proper seating postures such as sitting ‘crossed legged’, this position externally rotates the legs and allows for proper development.  As well as doing activities which strengthen posterior muscles (such as the gluteals) are encouraged.

If your child experiences these symptoms, an assessment with a podiatrist may be required.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – Symptoms & Treatment

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from over-extension joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces. Most commonly these injuries will occur during high impact activity with different sports carrying higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing 
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Activity modification
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
    • Laser treatment

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

NAIL POLISH – YES OR NO? Read our latest blog for a solution if you said yes!

Nail Polish

Did you know that your nails are porous and they absorb what you put onto them?

Many nail polishes contain ingredients that are listed as POISONOUS. Some are listed as carcinogens and others have been linked to birth defects and breathing issues!

Why don’t we recommend it?

Nail polish can invite fungal growth to the nail. It creates a barrier which locks in pathogens and creates a protective layer. It also makes it difficult to spot changes in the nail and early signs of a fungal infection. Fungal nail infections can be very difficult to remove and we recommend taking steps to reduce your risk.

If you want to wear it, what should you do?

  • Thoroughly remove the current coat of nail polish before applying a new layer
  • Allow some time for you nail to ‘breath’ before a new layer, this allows the nail to rebuild lost oils
  • When removing layers, watch for signs of fungal nail infection such as changes in colour or thickness
  • Watch for any irritation or reaction from the nail polish to the surrounding skin. If you find a brand your skin can tolerate, try to stay with the same one to reduce the risk of a reaction occurring
  • We highly recommend FRANKIE4’s Safe 7 – a nail polish developed at Salon Standard without those scary ingredients!

For more info check out https://frankie4.com.au/shop/nail-polish.html

 

WHICH SHOES TO WEAR WHEN YOU TRAVEL?

During travel it is most likely you will walk a lot more than usual.

Shoes that hold your foot in at the heel will reduce the amount of work your muscles will have to do as you are walking and reduce the risk of fatigue. For this and many other reasons, we recommend a good pair of sneakers. They also provide support and protection during your travels. Be sure to assess your current shoes for wear and tear. Most commonly, a shoe will need to be replaced after 18-24 months.

How to tell if you need new shoes:

  • Is the tread worn on the bottom of the shoe?
  • Is the sole pulling away from the shoe?
  • Is the lining tearing or looking worn?
  • Are they uncomfortable or make you feel unstable?

These might be signs that you need a new pair of shoes. If you decide you need a new pair of shoes, go to your local shoe store and follow these steps:

When buying:

  • Buy at the end of the day as your feet may swell slightly
  • Check are they appropriate how much walking you will do or the type of surface you will walk?
  • Try the shoes on for 5-10 minutes in the store to really understand if the fit is correct
  • Ensure the shoe feels good on the day, do not expect the shoes to “wear in”

How to fit the shoe:

  • Thumbs widths extra space from your big toe to the end of the shoe
  • The shoe doesn’t twist or bend at the midfoot
  • The shape, width and depth is correct for the shape for your toes

 

  • Are they orthotic friendly (if you wear these) or do you need a shoe which provide more support?

What to watch out for:

  • Any areas of rubbing or blisters from the shoe
  • Pain in the achilles tendon, under the arch or in the big toe
  • Do you feel unstable in the shoes?
  • Avoid elastic attachments as they will gradually loosen
  • Avoid the temptation of very soft/cushioned shoes as they are often very flexible and will not provide enough support for most foot types

If you want a second opinion or a more customised recommendation, see your local podiatrist.

If you do require new shoes it is most likely that good shoes are not cheap, but they will help you a lot during your holiday away.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

BLISTERS…why do they occur and prevention

Blisters form due to repetitive friction and trauma to the skin.

They are most commonly caused by rubbing or friction from footwear applying pressure to the foot and overloading the soft tissue during activity.A blister forms as a clear fluid filled lesion within the outer layers of the skin.

What to do:
– If the blister is closed; keep the blister protected (with a dressing), do not ‘pop’ the blister and reduce activity/change footwear.
– If the blister opens, apply antiseptic (e.g. betadine) to the area and a dressing. Reduce activity and monitor the blister for signs of infection. If any signs of infection occur contact your doctor.

Prevention

  • Appropriate shoe fit and style
  • Double layered socks and/or moisture wicking socks
  • Tapes/dressings
  • Paddings
  • Lubricant

Long term treatment

  • Footwear change
  • Biomechanical assessment to investigate areas of high pressure
  • Sock choice
  • Activity modification
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

TOTAL CARE PODIATRY ~ FREE FAMILY FOOT CLINIC RETURNS ~ 2nd of July 2020

Free family foot clinic!

THURSDAY 2nd of July 2020

15 minute FREE consultation 

Please arrive on time to help our family clinic run on time

Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed

Call our friendly reception staff today to secure your appointment 5223 1531