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FIVE SIGNS YOUR CHILD MAY HAVE A FOOT PROBLEM

Five Signs your Child may have a Foot Problem

 

In-toeing or tripping

Usually, sometimes thought of as the internal rotation of the foot but formally known as Metatarsus Adductus, Metatarsus Adductus is usually picked from birth at the very latest into the first year of growth but if left undetected may be a cause of in-toeing along with other things like an Internal Genicular (Knee) Position, Internal Tibial Torsion or Femoral torsion from the hip. It is best to get these things checked from the age of birth to the age of 6 to ensure nothing that needs to be treated is left untreated. 

 

Limping, pain, or withdrawing from or lagging behind in activities

If your child complains of foot or lower leg pain that lasts longer than an initial trip or fall or a few days, you should get your child assessed. 

 

Growing pains

For some children, growing pains may be more abnormal and associated with a Hypermobility joint syndrome which is best understood early to prevent excessive strain, pain or injury as well as some abnormal foot structures that can be associated with more profound growing pains. 

 

Your child is lagging in developmental milestones or has awkward gait

Although these may be not associated directly with foot problems, children require a stable foundation from the feet to allow basic motor skills as early as birth to first steps. If your child has some abnormality in their foot structure or alignment as discussed above, some of these motor skill milestones may be delayed; if not due to other red flags such as potential neuromuscular conditions. It is great to see your Paediatric nurse or Podiatrist if you have concerns.  

 

Tip toe walking

It is normal in the first few years of growth for a child to walk on their tip toes as they become accustomed to the confidence of walking. However, beyond the age of 3 if this continues it can suggest the potential for tightness and pain through the calf muscles if not treated, issues with growth phases, or also the potential for a developmental or intellectual condition diagnosis.  

Think your child has a foot problem? See our friendly Podiatrists for our monthly free Paediatric foot check and screening held on a Wednesday each month. Contact our helpful Reception team for details, you can also get a referral from your Paediatric nurse. PH: 52231531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

CHILDREN’S INJURED FEET

Children’s Injured Feet

Problems causing injury to paediatric feet are often correlated with the maturity level of bone development and can be categorized based on the age of your child. 

The following may predispose a child to a gradually developed injury: 

  • Congenital anomalies
  • Variation in development
  • Bone maturation
  • Lower leg alignment 

… but otherwise, given the nature of children with high physical activity levels, acute injury to the foot can occur. 

What does pain/injury look like, sometimes if subtle in a child?

It is important to be aware of the difference in pain presentation between older and younger children. 

Toddlers and young children: a child may limp, tire easily or refuse to walk or weightbear due to pain or injury. 

Older children and adolescents: their ability to compensate or isolate the pain may be better so injuries may go along unnoticed for a longer period. 

Acute vs Developmental Injury

Acute injuries are more likely in children (the younger they are) to result in stress reactions or fractures to the bone and often at the growth plate, rather than ligamentous strain or injury due to the fact children are undergoing stages of bone maturation as they develop into early adolescence and have relatively stronger ligaments than adults. 

Growth Phases

If your child is noticeably fatiguing or lagging behind other children, it is important to get an understanding of what may be the cause, and a Podiatric initial assessment can be a great starting point, to rule out any biomechanical insufficiences or growth abnormalities that for any reason haven’t been picked up on.  

When children go through growth phases, muscles can become fatigued easily as they can tug at the ends of the bone as the bone lengthens and grows; resulting in discomfort and fatigue not unlike the traditionally known “growing pains”. 

Common Paediatric specific injuries to the foot include: 

Sever’s Disease (Apophysitis of insertion of Achilles tendon into Calcaneus/heel bone)Age: 7-14

-Commonly known as children’s heel pain-pain at the back of the heel towards the bottom, associated with children experiencing growth phases. 

Osgood Schlatter’s (Apophysitis of insertion of Patellar Ligament into Tibial tuberosity)

Age: Ages 10-14

-Painful lump growth just below the kneecap, associated with children experiencing growth phases but more common in children playing sports involving running and jumping. 

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) 

Age: Anywhere from 6 months to 16 years of age

-Joint pain, stiffness and inflammation or region warmth most commonly affecting the Ankle Joint as well as other joints in the body. 

Osteochrondritis Dissecans (OCD)

Age: Children & Adolescents 

-Often affecting the ankle after an ankle sprain or injury where a reduction in blood supply to the bone region affected causes a small fracture. The fragment of bone may remain attached or become detached. 

Sesamoiditis or Sesamoid Pathology

-Pain under the ball of the big toe joint which can be due to inflammation of the two sesamoid bones (small pebble sized bones situated under the metatarsal head that allow the gliding effect of the tendon of the muscle that flexes the big toe downward). 

-A common sporting injury in young athletes who push off the ball of the foot such as in jumping sports, ballet or karate. 

A reminder, Total Care Podiatry has a monthly free Paediatric Screening clinic where your Podiatrist will run through a free assessment to check on developmental norms in your child. We ask that to book into this clinic, a small donation be made to Kids Plus foundation upon attending. Kids Plus offers programs that include early treatment and specific intervention strategies to improve children’s abilities across a range of developmental areas. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Some information from today’s blog obtained from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2323000/

SURFCOAST TREK RECOVERY

There are many things to consider after the trek – these are some tips we would recommend: 

  1. Take a recovery pair of socks and shoes. Clean and dry your feet and put these on after the event to prevent blisters. Keep warm. 
  2. Go for brunch! Treat yourself. You will be tired, and your body will be hungry for a high protein and carb meal. It is important to refuel!
  3. A light stretch and walk in the afternoon for optimal muscle recovery 
  4. Avoid deep tissue massage in the first week – be gentle and start with light muscle recovery. If you have any pain that is disproportional to what you consider to be normal recovering muscle pain, seek advice from the appropriate healthcare professional be it your GP, physiotherapist, or podiatrist 😊 

If you have any queries before the trek, come in for your free 15 minute foot check! 

PH: 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

WHAT RUNNER IS SUITED TO MY FOOT SIZE AND SHAPE?

What runner is suited to my foot size and shape? 

The choice we make in deciding on an appropriate pair of runners for walking or running can be made in relation to many features of our feet.

First and foremost to address is the size and shape of our feet. 

Our feet can change in size or length, shape and width across the time of our lifespan, including as you age. 

So it is important to get your size and width remeasured each time or every second time you get fit for shoes. 

 

Here are my top tips for fitting shoes to feet of all shapes and sizes!

 

  1. A rule of thumb- test that you have one thumb’s width of airspace compressible just beyond your longest toe in a shoe. 

This allows for the change in size to your foot: 

-When you are more active as your foot slides forward in a shoe

-When your feet swell up during physical exercise 

 

Source: https://www.blister-prevention.com/optimal-shoe-fit/

 

NARROW FEET

–> Ensure the fit of your shoe is secure through the heel and ankle, snug through midfoot and be cautious not to overpull laces too tight across the forefoot as we do require some wriggle room for any foot shape at the toes. 

-The sole or platform of the shoe in a curved last shape may assist to contour your midfoot as visible below

 

-In runners and some dress shoes, for women this means a 2A width (Narrow) and for men in very select shoe styles this means a B width (Narrow). 

-Note that regardless of a shoe’s stated width, some shoestyles may fit more narrow than others-speak to your trusted footwear professional instore for any particular shoe styles that suit!

 

Some of my favourites are:

  • Asics Gel DS Trainer 
  • Asics Glideride 
  • Brooks Ravenna
  • Brooks Transcend 
  • Brooks Adrenaline 2A (or B Width for mens)
  • Asics GT 2000 2A Width (or D width for mens fits more snug) 
  • Nike Pegasus 
  • Mizuno Wave Rider (fits very generously through the forefoot though)
  • Saucony Guide (fits very generously through forefoot though)
  • Brooks Levitate 
  • New Balance Fuel Cell Prism 
  • Brooks Glycerin 17 
  • Hoka Clifton 

 

Lacing technique tip: Lock lace by use of the extra eyelet at your ankle to secure heel and ankle into back of shoe, hugging a narrow heel and preventing slipping around inside. You can always ask your Podiatrist how to lock lace at your next appointment! There are other techniques available for narrow feet. 

 

WIDE FEET or feet with Bunions

–> It’s simple-ensure a wider fitting shoe! If you’re not sure when trying shoes on, compress the sides of the shoe on your foot and if you feel tightness or bony prominences-always if in doubt-go wider!

-The sole or platform of the shoe being wider also helps ie a straight lasted shoe such as visible below

Source: http://hub.therunningworks.net/running-shoes-everything-you-need-to-know/

 

Bunions are a change in alignment of our 1st or 5th Metatarsophalangeal joint that over time can create painful bony prominences to both sides of our forefoot. Excessive pressure to this joint deformity caused by narrow shoes can exacerbate the deformity and pain associated. 

 

It is most helpful upon fitting a shoe to test with your hands by compressing the sides of the shoe. The best case scenario is that there is an air bubble of space surrounding your bunion. 

 

In runners and some dress shoes, for women this means a D width (Wide) or 2E width (Extra Wide) 

For men this means a 2E width (Wide) or 4E width (Extra Wide) 

 

Some of my favourites are:

  • Brooks Dyad or Brooks Addiction 
  • New Balance 940 
  • Saucony Echelon
  • Asics Fortitude 8 
  • Asics Gel Pursue
  • Asics GT 4000 
  • New Balance 880
  • New Balance Fresh Foam Moar 
  • Mizuno Wave Inspire D/2E Width (good for forefoot width) 
  • Hoka Bondi D/2E Width
  • Hoka Gaviota 

 

Lacing technique tip: Start the shoe lacing from the 2nd eyelet from the front of the shoe, skipping the first to ensure the tightest point of fit is not across your bunion joint region. 

 

BROAD FEET, HIGH ARCHED FEET or feet with ORTHOTICS

–> Ensure adequate shoe depth

This will prevent: 

-A feeling of tightness or restriction across the top of your foot when you tie up the laces or fixate your shoe closed

-Heel slippage-commonly occurs in shoes that are too shallow to fit an orthotic. 

 

TOE DEFORMITIES and TOE ALIGNMENT

The toebox of a shoe in a closed toe shoe is the area encompassing all your toes. 

Some brands like Frankie 4 stock shoes with various toe box shapes to suit different toe alignments.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Toe_box_size.jpg

 

Tips:

-Ensure adequate shoe depth and width in the “toebox” of the shoe

i.e.  Avoid pointed toe shoes 

 

Source: https://www.somfootwear.com/blogs/news/wide-toe-box-shoes

 

This will prevent: 

-Pressure to the tops of claw or hammer toes, to prevent further deformity, pain, callous or corn formation. 

-Prevent interdigital pressure between toes and the formation of bunions. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

TOTAL CARE PODIATRY ~ FREE FAMILY FOOT CLINIC 9th July 2021

Free family foot clinic!

Friday 9th July 2021

15 minute FREE assessment & advice

Please arrive on time to help our family clinic run on time

Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed

Call our friendly reception staff today to secure your appointment 5223 1531

 

MARATHON RECOVERY

Recovery from any sporting event is critical to injury prevention and must be a component that should be planned into your training program. The main basic steps to follow in the first few days: 

On the day: 

  • Keep warm. Your body will cool down rapidly which is stressful to your cells, so have tracksuit pants and a jumper ready, and get your wet clothes off. 
  • Eat. Protein – bananas, energy bars, sporting drinks, fruit are all good options and will help with recovery. 
  • Ice bath. Later in the day when you get home an ice bath will help with muscular repair. 
  • Walk. A light walk in the evening before going to bed.

Day 1 – 3 of recovery: 

  • Warm bath followed by stretch.

  • Eat, and eat lots. Focus on carbs and protein to refuel.
  • Light massage – no deep tissue at this stage, it will be too much for muscle fibres.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK AGES 65 & OVER – Slow & Steady…

It helps to take things slowly!

Think about what activity you would like to do and break down your goals into manageable milestones.

Whether you start with a short walk or some simple movements indoors, you can build up from there.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

INTRODUCING OUR NEWEST TEAM MEMBER ~ PODIATRIST CLEMENTINE SCHEFFERS

Clementine Scheffers

Clementine is a graduate of La Trobe University with a Bachelor of Applied Science and Masters of Podiatric Practice.
She is passionate about acute and chronic injury rehabilitation and sports injury management, given her love and passion for sport growing up, as well as managing a chronic injury herself. Clementine has a wealth of knowledge in all things running shoes and will be your go to for shoe advice!
In her spare time, Clementine enjoys listening to her favourite artists and keeping up with the latest music releases, walking her Wheaten Terrier Riley, staying active and spending time with her cousins in Torquay.

IT’S IN THE WAY YOU WALK…Check out our latest blog for more information

FEEL THE BALANCE

A persons gait simply refers to the way they stand, walk or run. An abnormal gait can be caused by one or more parts of the body (such as the hips or knees) under-performing, which can lead to imbalances elsewhere in the body. A podiatrist will analyse the way you walk to help identify any imbalances or areas of weakness.

THE DOMINO EFFECT

Did you know that a podiatrist doesn’t just study the feet during gait analysis? Let’s say you are suffering from hip pain, this could be related to the way you walk. Or your feet might turn inwards or outwards, and the compensation your muscles have to make to keep you upright can actually be the cause of your pain. Your podiatrist can explain how all these elements relate to each other and back to YOU!

THE WEAKEST LINK

The way you walk can reveal which parts of your body are perhaps weaker than others. Did you know that compensations in the body can lead to imbalance around the joints and the main muscles – such as hamstrings, glutes, quads and calves? These observations can all tie in with hip, knee, foot and ankle pains. This means those areas may become less active and end up contributing less than should. A gait analysis can reveal these kinds of issues and more.

 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

CALLING ALL TRADIES

GET A GOOD SLEEP

Start with your feet if you want to become more fit.
Those early mornings can build up to a sleep deficit if you are not heading to bed early most nights. Make sure you are well rested so that your mental and physical health benefit

STAY HYDRATED

It is easy to forget to drink water, so pack a bottle that is easily carried and likely to be used. Remember to refill as much as possible, so your kidneys will thank you…

MAKE SURE YOU ARE SUPPORTED

This starts with making sure you have supportive footwear and the right tools to do your job. Maybe your feet need to be measured again, since they change as we age. See your podiatrist if you have any foot or lower limb pain, don’t ignore it!

EAT WELL

This can require a little planning…

A healthy packed lunch can go a long way to support your well being and your budget. Think of a mix of colours when it comes to fruit and veg, and mix of food types such as proteins, carbs, grains and so forth

OPEN UP

If you are feeling down or frustrated, talk about your feelings with a trusted person or professional. Vulnerability is not a weakness, and mental health is just as important as physical health. Reach out to a range of professional help linessuch as:

Beyond Blue 1300 22 4636 or LifeLine 13 11 14

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.