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KNOCK KNEES – When to book an appointment to see your podiatrist?

Knock knees

Also known as genu valgus, is when the knees ‘face each other’.

This position commonly occurs between the ages of 3 to 4 and will slowly reduce or ‘straighten up’ with age. 

When to book an appointment

  • Asymmetry
  • Any pain
  • Outside of age for stage
  • Excessive knock knees
  • Level of activity is affected 
  • The child is ‘clumsy’ or unbalanced

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

COMPLIMENTARY PAEDIATRIC CLINIC

Complimentary Paediatric Clinic 

Every month at Total Care Podiatry we run a complimentary morning clinic to support the little feet that run around our community. We run short appointments designed to be a screening check of any areas of concern you may have for your child’s feet. 

Commonly we check for: 

  • ‘Tired legs’
  • Being clumsy
  • Walking ‘pigeon-toed’
  • Curly toes
  • ‘Flat feet’

Following a short appointment, we can provide some advice for next steps forward. These may include a more in depth follow up appointment, footwear recommendations or activity changes.

Bookings are essential – please phone our friendly staff on 5223 1531 to secure your free paediatric appoint today

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY – Who does it affect? Read our latest blog to find out more!

Achilles Tendinopathy

Tendinitis (inflammation), Tendinosis (degenerative) or Rupture

The Achilles tendon attaches the muscles of the calf to the calcaneus (heel bone). This tendon undergoes a lot of stress due to the amount of tension and forces it withstands. Over time, if the amount of stress to this tendon is too great, it may lead to an injury to the area and pain to develop. Most commonly, there will be a single event or injury that will cause the pain to start. 

Symptoms

  • May have started from an event/injury
  • Pain on movement or palpation
  • Swelling of the ankle
  • Bruising in the area

When injured, treatment of the Achilles tendon involves progressively loading the tissue as it best reacts to load. Repeated stimulation allows the tendon to properly heal and return to its ideal state

Treatment is tailored to each patient and their unique presentation

Treatment may include:

  • Surgery (if a rupture occurs)
  • Moonboot
  • Heel lifts
  • Exercise program
  • Activity modifications
  • THOR Laser
  • Taping
  • Orthotics
  • Footwear Recommendations
  • Activity Modification

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – check out our latest blog for treatment recommendations

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from high forces at the end range of motion of a joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces.

Different sports will carry higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing and when pain started
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
  • Activity modification

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY – PLANTAR FASCIITIS – PLANTAR HEEL PAIN

Plantar fasciopathy

  • Also known as plantar fasciitis, plantar fasciosis or plantar heel pain.

Refers to dysfunction of the plantar fascia (or plantar aponeurosis) under the foot. It is a connective tissue which connects the heel to the toes. The tissue may thicken, tear or become inflamed from overloading.

Symptoms

  • Pain under the arch of the foot. Most often ‘first step’ pain which occurs in the morning or after rest.
  • Can occur gradually over time or from an acute injury

Risk factors

  • High BMI
  • Reduced ankle range of motion
  • Foot structure
  • Occupation: jobs involving a lot of time standing

Treatment

  • Biomechanical assessment
  • Offloading with taping or orthotics
  • Footwear recommendations
  • Pain relief 
  • Activity modifications
  • THOR low level laser treatment to help reduce inflammation
  • Stretches

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

HOW MANY PHALANGES DOES A HUMAN HAVE?

56 phalanges!

There are 56 phalanges (bones) in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two. 
The phalanges of the fingers help us manipulate our environment while the phalanges of the foot help us balance, walk, and run.

Phalanges have many attachments such as muscles (via tendons), ligaments and other soft tissue.

Treatment of Toe Fractures

Fractures of the toe bones are almost always traumatic fractures. Treatment for traumatic fractures depends on the break itself and may include these options:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is all that is needed to treat a traumatic fracture of the toe.
  • Splinting. The toe may be fitted with a splint to keep it in a fixed position.
  • Rigid or stiff-soled shoe. Wearing a stiff-soled shoe protects the toe and helps keep it properly positioned. Use of a postoperative shoe or bootwalker is also helpful.
  • Buddy taping the fractured toe to another toe is sometimes appropriate, but in other cases, it may be harmful.
  • Surgery. If the break is badly displaced or if the joint is affected, surgery may be necessary. Surgery often involves the use of fixation devices, such as pins

Consequences of Improper Treatment

Some people say that “the doctor can’t do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is usually not true. In fact, if a fractured toe or metatarsal bone is not treated correctly, serious complications may develop. For example:

  • A deformity in the bony architecture, which may limit the ability to move the foot or cause difficulty in fitting shoes.
  • Arthritis, which may be caused by a fracture in a joint (the juncture where two bones meet), or may be a result of angular deformities that develop when a displaced fracture is severe or has not been properly corrected.
  • Chronic pain and deformity.
  • Non-union, or failure to heal, can lead to subsequent surgery or chronic pain.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

 

 

CURLY OR OVERLAPPING TOES???

UNDERLAPPING, OVERLAPPING OR VARUS TOES

Characteristics
The toes stay in a flexed position with rotation towards the centre of the foot.
Curly toes are theorised to be caused by the muscles tightening and leading to the toes to buckle at the joint and stay in a flexed or curled position.
Curly toes are often genetic and can affect the 3rd, 4th and 5th toes. 

Curly toes develop before birth and do not usually express symptoms.
32.6 out of 1000 have curly toes as a child with 25-50% spontaneously resolve by age six.

Associated Symptoms

  • Nails on affected toes may become shortened, thickened and/or flattened.
  • Blisters, callus or corns may develop on the affected toes due to pressure.  

Treatment Options

  • Managing symptoms. 
  • Footwear recommendations. 
  • Tapping the overlapping and underlapping toes together in infants.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

NAILS AND SKIN CARE AT TOTAL CARE PODIATRY

At Total Care Podiatry your podiatrist will begin by assessing and treating the area of most concern to you and will cut your nails and painlessly remove any callus or corns. The circulation and sensation in your feet will be assessed, as will any lumps and bumps and/or foot dysfunction that may cause pressure points. Excessive pressure areas under your feet and on your toes can lead to corns and calluses or pressure ulcers.

Conditions this service treats & how does it work

Treatments for nail and skin conditions may include:

  • Painless removal of corns and callus and thickened skin
  • Treatment and ongoing advice on preventing cracked heels
  • Ingrown Toenail surgery to remove nail spike or complete removal of nail if clinically indicated.
  • Fungal nail treatments
  • Removal and treatment of plantar warts
  • Custom made silicon toe wedges or splinting to straighten overlapped toes or protect and prevent rubbing of toes.

What are the benefits of this treatment

Corns, calluses and thickened skin are generally symptoms of other problems, so it is important for your podiatrist to examine your feet to work out what could be causing the pressure so they can provide a treatment plan which includes offloading these areas.

Your podiatrist will also provide you with advice on how you can care for your feet to prevent ongoing problems and on whether further treatment is recommended.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

WHICH SHOES TO WEAR WHEN YOU TRAVEL?

During travel it is most likely you will walk a lot more than usual.

Shoes that hold your foot in at the heel will reduce the amount of work your muscles will have to do as you are walking and reduce the risk of fatigue. For this and many other reasons, we recommend a good pair of sneakers. They also provide support and protection during your travels. Be sure to assess your current shoes for wear and tear. Most commonly, a shoe will need to be replaced after 18-24 months.

How to tell if you need new shoes:

  • Is the tread worn on the bottom of the shoe?
  • Is the sole pulling away from the shoe?
  • Is the lining tearing or looking worn?
  • Are they uncomfortable or make you feel unstable?

These might be signs that you need a new pair of shoes. If you decide you need a new pair of shoes, go to your local shoe store and follow these steps:

When buying:

  • Buy at the end of the day as your feet may swell slightly
  • Check are they appropriate how much walking you will do or the type of surface you will walk?
  • Try the shoes on for 5-10 minutes in the store to really understand if the fit is correct
  • Ensure the shoe feels good on the day, do not expect the shoes to “wear in”

How to fit the shoe:

  • Thumbs widths extra space from your big toe to the end of the shoe
  • The shoe doesn’t twist or bend at the midfoot
  • The shape, width and depth is correct for the shape for your toes

 

  • Are they orthotic friendly (if you wear these) or do you need a shoe which provide more support?

What to watch out for:

  • Any areas of rubbing or blisters from the shoe
  • Pain in the achilles tendon, under the arch or in the big toe
  • Do you feel unstable in the shoes?
  • Avoid elastic attachments as they will gradually loosen
  • Avoid the temptation of very soft/cushioned shoes as they are often very flexible and will not provide enough support for most foot types

If you want a second opinion or a more customised recommendation, see your local podiatrist.

If you do require new shoes it is most likely that good shoes are not cheap, but they will help you a lot during your holiday away.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531