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Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP ONE

Let’s talk toenails…Not the most delightful topic, but oh so important when it comes to looking after your foot health.

Did you know that fungal nail infection happens when the nail becomes discoloured, thickened and brittle? Here is how to minimise your chances of this happening.

DO

  • Wash and dry your feet thoroughly
  • Wear flip flops in public showers or pool areas
  • Dry your socks in the sunlight, since UV is a natural fungus killer!
  • Consider adding tea tree oil to your moisturiser, in your next load of sock washing, or even using a diluted tea tree oil spray on your feet to help reduce the risk of a fungal infection

DONT

  • Go barefoot in public showers or pool areas
  • Wear the same socks two days in a row
  • Dry your socks inside out of direct sunlight
  • Share shoes

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

DIABETES AND HEATERS

Diabetes and heaters

Over time, diabetes may affect the blood vessels and nerves in your feet. This results in reduced or loss of protective sensations in the feet. 

One of these sensations is the body’s ability to detect changes in temperature and specifically if it is too hot or cold. The body may also have more difficulty in sweat regulation of the skin. 

For these reasons, heaters can become a danger risk. The body may not be able to detect the skin overheating and a burn may occur. For this reason, the following step should be followed:

  • Check the distance of your feet to the heater and assess if it may be too hot (do not sit close to the heater or fire)
  • Check your feet regularly for any changes to the skin and check the temperature of your toes and sole of the foot
  • Avoid sitting with your feet by the fire/heater
  • Avoid setting the car heater vents toward the feet

WHICH SHOES TO WEAR WHEN YOU TRAVEL?

During travel it is most likely you will walk a lot more than usual.

Shoes that hold your foot in at the heel will reduce the amount of work your muscles will have to do as you are walking and reduce the risk of fatigue. For this and many other reasons, we recommend a good pair of sneakers. They also provide support and protection during your travels. Be sure to assess your current shoes for wear and tear. Most commonly, a shoe will need to be replaced after 18-24 months.

How to tell if you need new shoes:

  • Is the tread worn on the bottom of the shoe?
  • Is the sole pulling away from the shoe?
  • Is the lining tearing or looking worn?
  • Are they uncomfortable or make you feel unstable?

These might be signs that you need a new pair of shoes. If you decide you need a new pair of shoes, go to your local shoe store and follow these steps:

When buying:

  • Buy at the end of the day as your feet may swell slightly
  • Check are they appropriate how much walking you will do or the type of surface you will walk?
  • Try the shoes on for 5-10 minutes in the store to really understand if the fit is correct
  • Ensure the shoe feels good on the day, do not expect the shoes to “wear in”

How to fit the shoe:

  • Thumbs widths extra space from your big toe to the end of the shoe
  • The shoe doesn’t twist or bend at the midfoot
  • The shape, width and depth is correct for the shape for your toes

 

  • Are they orthotic friendly (if you wear these) or do you need a shoe which provide more support?

What to watch out for:

  • Any areas of rubbing or blisters from the shoe
  • Pain in the achilles tendon, under the arch or in the big toe
  • Do you feel unstable in the shoes?
  • Avoid elastic attachments as they will gradually loosen
  • Avoid the temptation of very soft/cushioned shoes as they are often very flexible and will not provide enough support for most foot types

If you want a second opinion or a more customised recommendation, see your local podiatrist.

If you do require new shoes it is most likely that good shoes are not cheap, but they will help you a lot during your holiday away.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

OUR FREE FAMILY FOOT CLINIC RETURNS ~ 2nd of July 2020

Free family foot clinic!

THURSDAY 2nd of July 2020

15 minute FREE consultation 

Please arrive on time to help our family clinic run on time

Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed

Call our friendly reception staff today to secure your appointment PH: 5223 1531

 

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

FEET AND ANKLE INJURY FREE -WHILST SMASHING OUT HIIT SESSIONS

Due to the nature of HIIT (high intensity interval training), certain stresses may be placed on the feet and ankles, especially if this is a new form of exercise for you.

It is important to build the strength in your legs prior to engaging in HIIT training, as movements are often rapid and repetitious. It can place excessive pressure on your joints if your HIIT workouts are too frequent, and you do ‘too much too soon’, like many other activities. There are specific modifications that your trainer may be able to suggest if you have any concerns. Correct technique is crucial, so it is necessary for you and your trainer to be on top of this, to avoid injury.
Should you develop an injury, seek medical advice as soon as possible.

Be sure to wear appropriate footwear. When buying athletic footwear for your HIIT workout, stick with a ‘neutral’ shoe, unless it has been otherwise suggested by your health professional.
The shoe should have a firm heel counter (doesn’t fold right down if you try to push it with your fingers). The shoe should have a moderate amount of cushioning (without it being too heavy), for good shock attenuation to reduce the amount of force on the feet and legs. The softer the outer sole however, the faster it will compress, which we want to avoid.

If you do not feel as you are being adequately ‘supported’ or have enough cushioning, try altering your footwear. If this doesn’t change anything, there may be other things that your Podiatrist can manage or educate you with.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

FUSS ABOUT SOCKS

Socks provide an interface between our feet and the shoes we choose to wear. Generally, closed in footwear is designed to wear a sock with, so choosing appropriate ones can make a great difference to how the shoe feels!

Understand the pros and cons of different materials, so that when you are looking at the sock ingredients, you know what you’re in for!

  • Merino wool: breathable, can be worn all year round! Soft, cushioned and itch free, moisture wicking. Popular for sports people and hikers.
  • Acrylic: cheaper than wool, dries reasonably fast, not as good at wicking away moisture.
  • Cotton: traps moisture! Not good if you are prone to sweating as you will find yourself blister prone wearing cotton socks.
  • Nylon: often combined with other fabrics to increase sock durability. Also dries very quickly.
  • Stretch fabrics such as elastin, nylon or spandex: allows stretch so socks fit well and snug your foot! Make sure they only comprise of about 2-5% of the fabric.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.