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TENNIS INJURIES

Tennis Injuries

 

Lateral Ankle Sprains

Tennis is a multidirectional sport that comes with a great degree of lateral moment, specifically as the athlete’s eyes are on the ball and often not watching their foot placement. The running, jumping and landing involved (even when serving the ball) in tennis can result in landing incorrectly turning the ankle over. It is good to be mindful that clay courts are slippery but also soft, so the lateral aspect of the foot can dig into the ground upon landing, inverting the foot and significantly increase the risk of an ankle sprain. 

Tennis Toe ie Subungual Haematoma

Tennis toe is caused by repeated pressure or injury to the toenail causing pooling of blood under the nail. A Subungual Haematoma is common in tennis as the big toe especially is used to drag on the ground during a serve or play, as well as the “stop and start” nature of the game, causing the toe to glide towards and hit the end of the shoe. Often however this injury is primarily caused by shoes that are too short, or narrow at the toebox, so make sure you get fitted professionally into tennis shoes as well as keeping the toenail clipped short to avoid this issue. If your big toe goes “up at the end” and commonly hits the top of your shoe, come into the clinic for a Musculoskeletal assessment to look at options to reduce the hyperextension of the big toe joint. 

Sesamoiditis

The sesamoids are two small spherical bones underneath the base of your big toe, encased by the big toe’s flexor tendons that stabilized the big toe joint when flexed. Tennis players spend a lot of time on the toes to be ready to move quickly in response to game play quickly as well as landing on the toes a lot which places the joint in a flexed position under a lot of body weight. Repeated strain to the big toe joint in this position can cause the Sesamoid bones to be inflamed and in serious cases, fracture. 

Plantar Fasciitis or Plantar Heel Pain

Tennis is a sport played on hard surfaces in firm shoes. Although there are many Biomechanical factors that more commonly predispose someone to have Plantar Fasciitis, ie the inflammation of the long fascia band (a crucial tissue in the foot that is similar to muscle tissue) that connects at the heel, hard surfaces can contribute to symptoms if there is an existing heel pain caused by Plantar Fasciitis. It is important to see your Podiatrist to get these contributing factors addressed as this condition can become quite recalcitrant if left untreated. 

Peroneal Tendinopathy

The Peroneal musculature involves 3 muscle tendons running to the outside of foot, which when inflamed through Tendinopathy cause pain commonly to the lower lateral ankle but mostly to the lateral border of the foot. The Peroneal muscle group’s role is to evert or pronate the foot, and is often active as a reaction during an ankle sprain or excessive lateral load to take the foot out of the “rolled” or vulnerable position by rolling the foot in. In tennis, players have to rely on loading the lateral foot in change of direction, which can create overuse to the Peroneals and eventuate in injury over time. 

Achilles Tendinopathy 

A common overuse injury caused by microtrauma to the tendon described as pain, swelling and stiffness to the tendon either at its join at the back of the heel or towards the calf region. Achilles Tendinopathy is prevalent in tennis due to the major loads placed on the calf muscle in short bursts of movement (deceleration and acceleration) in game play and during hitting a forehand or a backhand by use of an open stance, which places a majority of the stress on the calf during the backswing. In serving, stress is also placed on the calf and achilles during a ball toss. It is important to rehabilitate this condition before continuing to play, as if the tendon is inflamed in some cases it can rupture or tear without intervention if repeated microtrauma is sufficient enough. 

Cramping

Muscle cramping, commonly in the calf or sole of the foot, occurs when there is a reduced blood supply to the area and in tennis is often due to an increased loss of bodily fluids due to sweating in exercise. 

Muscle cramps can be quite debilitating and frustrating, preventing a player from continuing in a match or reducing movement.

Preventing cramping 

Ensure cool clothes to reduce body temperature, drink electrolytes, ensure good training and strength and conditioning incorporated into training and prepare for long matches. 

Blisters

The main cause of blisters in tennis is a combination of friction and shear. In tennis due to the combination of both running and pivoting on the feet, the skin is pulled in different directions, and this is known as “shear” force. 

Preventing blisters

A tight fitting anatomical sock is best to reduce the likelihood of skin movement. Moisture wicking fibres are also helpful as the skin is more likely to break down into a blister when the foot is sweating. 

Injury Prevention Tips

Warm Up

Warming up especially before competitive tennis is crucial to prepare the body for the more strenuous nature and demands of competitive play. Tennis is a game that although has times of rest between points, is no less difficult and can be very gruelling and harsh on the body in longer game times! 

Shoes

Injury prevention? This is where appropriate shoes come into play. For tennis, if you are training once a week or more or playing matches or competitively at all you should definitely be wearing a shoe that is appropriate for the sport-a tennis specific shoe. Tennis shoes are categorised often into hard court, clay shoes or grass shoes. 

Tennis shoes are structured to provide: 

  • Rigidity to the midfoot and heel of the shoe to reduce the likelihood of unwanted torsion (rotation) through the foot, thus enhancing stability of the ankle in comparison to a pair of runners.
  • Allowance for lateral movements (side to side movement)
  • Panelling in the upper material that is more rigid around heel and midfoot to secure the ankle in place better
  • A toe guard at the toe box to protect the mesh upper from getting damaged during a drag/slide or toe pressure from inside the shoe. 
  • A hard court shoe is heavier, giving the shoe’s outsole durability and cushioning for hours on the more unforgiving surface
  • A herringbone or Entecar sole allows for the best grip on your surface whilst allowing a slide/drag if needed on a clay/Entecar court. 

Surfaces

  • If you can play on Clay or Grass, this is ideal for prevention of stress related or joint injuries as the surface is much softer and easier on the joints and feet!
  • However, if you are prone to ankle sprains, for example, a hard tennis court is better in assisting you to grip your surface better compared to the more slippery nature of a clay or grass surface.
  • Before starting to compete or play matches, make sure you are familiar with the court surface you will be competing on. 

Blisters

  • Check your feet for bony protrusions
  • Shake your shoes out especially after play on clay to avoid debris causing pressure areas on the feet during play
  • Lace up your shoes just right
  • Wear in new shoes gradually-ie walk around in your new tennis shoes first, then train in them, before playing a match

If you play tennis and have any injury even if experiencing different symptoms to the above common conditions, please book in with one of our Podiatrists for a Musculoskeletal assessment where we will form a comprehensive treatment plan so you can get back to the court as soon as possible!

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ANKLE PAIN ~ Check out our latest blog for more information!

ANKLE PAIN

Ankle pain is a common source of foot pain that can be as a result of an acute, one-off trauma injury to the ankle, repeated injury and overuse to the ankle joint and its surrounding anatomy, or also from degenerative changes to the ankle over time. However, there are other reasons as to why you may be suffering from ankle pain.

 

Ankle pain can also be in different regions of the ankle due to the number of bones that form the ankle joint.

 

The ankle joint is also known as the Talocrural Joint; formed by the connection between the Fibula (outside leg bone), Tibia (inside leg bone/shin bone), and Talus, a small bone that sits in the mortise shaped socket formed by the Fibula and Tibia. The end of the Tibia (your “inside ankle bone”) is called the Medial Malleolus, the end of the Fibula (your “outside ankle bone”) is called the Lateral Malleolus. The most common fracture to either of these bones is a lateral malleolus fracture.

 

 

General Ankle Joint pain

à Generalised, non localised pain to the whole ankle joint

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Osteoarthritis: Cartilage degeneration
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis : Inflammation to joint lining causing cartilage degeneration
  • An arthritic joint is frequently noticed by stiffness to the joint

 

Ankle pain

 

Lateral Ankle pain

à Pain on the outer side of your ankle

Commonly caused by an acute incident, but can be of gradual nature

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Ligament injuries (tear or rupture) : Anterior Talofibular (ATFL), Calcaneofibular (CFL), Posterior talofibular (PTFL)
  • High Ankle Sprain aka Syndesmosis Injury: Ligament injury to Distal Tibiofibular Ligament (ligament connecting your main leg bone/shin bone, to your outer leg bone)
  • Peroneal Tendinopathy/Tendinitis
  • Peroneal Subluxation/Dislocation
  • Fracture : Cuboid, 5th metatarsal “Jones” fracture or Lateral Malleolusankle lateral ligaments trauma pain location lateral inversion trauma inversion

 

Medial Ankle pain

à Pain on the inner side of your ankle

Usually due to overuse, ie “wear and tear”

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome or Medial Calcaneal Nerve Entrapment
  • Tibialis Posterior Tendinopathy
  • Ligament injury: Deltoid ligament
  • Flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy

Photo: Location of Tibialis Posterior Syndrome

Anterior Ankle Pain

–>Pain on the top of the foot at the front of your ankle joint

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Anterior Ankle Impingement

-Often due to Bone Spur formation

-Common in Soccer players or Dancers

-Often intense, sharp pain

  • Osteochondral lesion at Talar Dome
  • Tibialis Anterior Tendinopathy/Tendinitis
  • Extensor Retinaculum restriction/injury

Location of Pain in Anterior Ankle Impingement

 

The above information is informative only, see your Podiatrist for a detailed examination to determine what may be the cause of your ankle pain or injury, to diagnose correctly and form a comprehensive treatment plan to get you back and moving!

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

*Sources

https://orthopaedia.com/page/Anatomy-of-the-Foot-Ankle

https://www.completepaincare.com/patient-education/conditions-treated/ankle-pain/

https://www.physiocheck.co.uk/condition/4/lateral-ankle-ligament-injury

https://www.physioroom.com/injuries/ankle_and_foot/tibialis_posterior_syndrome_full.php

SURFCOAST TREK RECOVERY

There are many things to consider after the trek – these are some tips we would recommend: 

  1. Take a recovery pair of socks and shoes. Clean and dry your feet and put these on after the event to prevent blisters. Keep warm. 
  2. Go for brunch! Treat yourself. You will be tired, and your body will be hungry for a high protein and carb meal. It is important to refuel!
  3. A light stretch and walk in the afternoon for optimal muscle recovery 
  4. Avoid deep tissue massage in the first week – be gentle and start with light muscle recovery. If you have any pain that is disproportional to what you consider to be normal recovering muscle pain, seek advice from the appropriate healthcare professional be it your GP, physiotherapist, or podiatrist 😊 

If you have any queries before the trek, come in for your free 15 minute foot check! 

PH: 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

FOOTWEAR FEATURES IN RUNNING SHOES FOR COMMON FOOT CONDITIONS AND PATHOLOGIES

Footwear Features in running shoes for common foot conditions and pathologies

It is crucially important that we have a shoe that supports our feet in the right way and suits our personal needs and activity requirements. and no, by support this does not just mean arch support!

Our personal needs are not limited to our foot type and gait but include our injury history (both specific to the foot and upper body), our preferences based on previous shoe experiences, and the use of orthotics or other mechanical aids such as AFOs or Heel Lifts.

If you are doing a lot of activity for your occupation or lifestyle that involves walking or weightbearing, a pair of running shoes is a key shoe to have in your rotation due to its technologically advanced foam composition in the sole to provide a cushioning system to absorb the impact of your body weight as well as it’s stability features. Some of the features explained below for running shoes can also be replicated in other suitable, more formal footwear.

REARFOOT AND MIDFOOT PAIN

Such as…

ACHILLES PAIN

  • Commonly, avoid flat, thin soled shoes. A flatter soled shoe will stretch the achilles to its maximum and apply significant tension to the calf muscle, which if already inflamed will aggravate under this environment significantly.
  • So, ensure a high heel height (that is, the heel height, aka HHD or heel pitch is higher in reference to the thickness of the shoe sole at the forefoot). This does not mean wear high heeled shoes, but it does mean go for a pair of runners with at least a 12mm heel height differential. (Standard HHD is 10mm).

HEEL PAIN

Our heel, also known as our calcaneus, is essentially our first point of contact with the ground in most cases hence rarely gets a break. Plantar heel pain is a common condition that is exacerbated by excessive pressure to the heel and hard surfaces. Common conditions such as Plantar Fasciitis may be assisted by the following tips:

 

  • Commonly, avoid flat, thin soled shoes. Try a higher heel height in your shoes to offload pressure from the heel and create distance between the ground/hard surface you are walking on.
  • Most importantly, go for a premium cushioned shoe! Despite advertising’s best efforts, comfort wear shoes such as Sketchers are made up of a foam that does not last a long time with our body weight’s load and will compress, losing its structural integrity and shock absorption capacities.
  • Premium cushioning is best met with a running shoe using an EVA or Polyurethane foam composition, which has much more elastic or “spring back” energy to absorb your impact and ease strain to the heel.

 

ARCH PAIN

To relieve pain on our arch, shoes cannot specifically relieve pain.

  • However, a shoe with a more rigid density foam reinforced to the inside arch of the shoe will support the arch, which may reduce the potential of the foot to excessively pronate (roll in), given that sometimes excessive pronation can place greater strain on our arch and be one of the contributing factors to arch pain.

Caution: If your arch pain is quite tender and inflamed, a shoe with a significant density to the arch in initial stages may aggravate symptoms.

ANKLE PAIN & INSTABILITY

Ankle joint recurrent instability issues can be due to a number of causes. If your joints are hypermobile this can extend your joint’s motion to a range further than it should ie a maximum inversion ankle sprain. If your ligaments are loose, worn from previous injury or stretched over time; they will allow greater movement hence not protecting the joint from entering a risky range of motion.

Essentially, our shoes need to reduce motion laterally to the ankle joint! The bad news is, there are very few shoes that automatically are able to do this.

 

Important features that can help combat excessive motion by providing stability are:

  • Rigid last-the platform or sole of the shoe should be rigid and only bend at the toes. This means no Sketchers, “Nike Free Runs” or other shoes that simply fold in half (give your shoes the test today!). A flexible shoe has too much give to it, and will collapse and compress laterally underneath your body’s natural movement pathway, especially if your muscles and ligaments are weak and quite prone to ankle sprains/rolls.

 

  • Wide last-a wider last or shoe that has a lateral rearfoot flare ie flared shape of the shoe sole at the rearfoot section of the midsole/shoe sole, will allow greater total surface area contact with the ground, enhancing your balance and proprioception (awareness of your foot’s contact with the ground) hence enabling you to react more easily and more quickly if you roll your ankle.

 

FOREFOOT PAIN

  • Cushioning or added thickness to the forefoot section of the shoe sole will take pressure off an inflamed forefoot.
  • Adding a gel full length insole to your shoe is a second way to add shock absorption to the area to ease pressure from the ground up

 

Such as….

 

MORTON’S NEUROMA

-Wide fitting shoe in the toebox is crucial. Also try a loose fitting material. No pointed toe shoes!

Compression to either side of the forefoot either by a tight shoe material or simply a shoe that is too narrow will squeeze the inflamed nerve and elevate symptoms.

BUNIONS

-A wide fitting shoe is important, but did you know, a wide last in a shoe is also helpful?

Put simply, the platform or sole of your shoe should ultimately be slightly wider than the extent of your bunion’s bony prominence, as should the mesh have some airspace surrounding the bunion.

A wide last can also be attained by going for a pair of runners with a flaring to the outsides of the forefoot section of the shoe midsole/sole.

*RESOURCE – The bunion institute

 

1ST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS

-Big toe joint sore and not as mobile as it used to be? Consult your Podiatrist for an appointment to discuss this. You may have Osteoarthritis in your big toe joint (this is the joint at the “knuckle” of your big toe, not the joint that bends the tip of your toe).

-Try a shoe with a rocker bottom or a very rigid sole (aka a shoe with a sole that bends minimally at the crease of the forefoot where a shoe normally bends for your toes). Reducing excessive motion at a joint with already limited motion is likely to help relieve osteoarthritic joint pain. Brands include: Hoka, New Balance, Asics, Chung Shi

LOWER BACK PAIN

Posturally, lower back issues can be aggravated by a higher heel on a shoe.

  • A shoe with a relatively neutral heel height or low heel height may put less strain on the posterior chain of the body. Consult your upper body health professional for further advice on your specific lower back condition as our spinal column is one with a multitude of anatomy and lower back pain can mean many things! Some people find symptoms alternatively alleviated with a slight heel.

Still unsure? Book in an appointment with your Podiatrist to have a Footwear Assessment and we can help you narrow down the most suitable shoes for your feet. We also have a number of partnerships and connections with shoe stores and shoe brands local and afar, to which we can direct you to their friendly teams for a new pair under our advice!

Phone our friendly front desk team today to make an appointment PH: 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND ITS EFFECT ON YOUR FEET

Rheumatoid Arthritis and its effect on your Feet

Is an autoimmune condition which causes inflammation in the joints of the hands and feet.

In the feet this may lead to:

  • Joint pain and reduced range of motion
  • Bunions
  • Shifting of the digits
  • Overall changes in the foot structure
  • Contraction of tendons
  • Rheumatoid nodules
  • Callous formation

Within podiatry, the goal of treatment is to decrease pain, preserve joint quality and range of motion.
We can do that by:

  • Exercises and stretches
  • Joint mobilisation
  • Orthotics 
  • Taping and/or paddings
  • Footwear recommendations
  • THOR Laser
  • Referrals to other allied health practitioners such as physiotherapists. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SURF COAST TREK?

Free Foot & Leg Assessment

Total Care Podiatry is offering Surf Coast trek participants a complimentary Foot and Leg Assessment.  This will take into account your individual requirements and help you work out a strategy to help your feet and legs stay the distance.

Call Total Care Podiatry on 5223 1531 to book in your Complimentary Foot & Leg Assessment.

Make sure you mention that you have registered for the Surf Coast Trek.

Preparing for a long distance walk

Getting your feet ready for a 40 km trek needs a lot of planning and preparation. You’re asking a lot of your poor feet pounding into the ground, and they’ll need some TLC to get you there.

Every individual’s body will respond differently so there’s no one solution that will suit everyone, especially in an endurance event lasting many hours like the Surfcoast Trek.

Just like your fitness, preparing your feet and legs has to start early, not the week before or the day before.

During the 40 km trek, your body will change in a number of ways to keep you going. The extent of the changes will very much rely on how you’ve trained your body prior to the event.

Here’s what will happen for most of us at the 20 to 30 km mark:

  • Muscles in our core and legs will tire and as a result our walking pattern will change, placing more pressure on our joints.
  • Feet may swell causing changes in how the foot fits into the shoe, causing pressure areas, and
  • The heels may start slipping up and down in the shoe as the calf muscles tighten, increasing the risk of blister formation.

Footwear

For endurance walking the shoes you wear will have a significant bearing on whether or not you enjoy the trek. The runners you use around the house or for activities such as walking around the block will probably not be appropriate.

  • Footwear should fit your foot comfortably, not too tight or loose.
  • The upper should be made of a material that will easily breathe and allow the perspiration that your feet generate evaporates into the environment rather than build-up heat in your foot.
  • The sole should not be too stiff or controlling and provide good cushioning.
  • The toe box, (the area of the shoe where your toes are), should be deep and rounded to accommodate any swelling.
  • No part of your foot should slip in the shoes, at any time.
  • It is best if the lace area is as long as possible so you can alter the fit around the heel from the midfoot and the forefoot. You may have to adjust the lacing a number of times during the walk, to make sure your foot is supported and any pressure areas lessened.
    For more information regarding lacing techniques look here: How to Lace a Hiking Boot

Blisters

Blisters are caused by friction, where the surface of the skin is held in one place and the tissues underneath the surface are stretched to the point of tearing. It is influenced by 3 things:

1. The nature of your skin

Our skin often has different qualities depending on age, sun exposure, gender, shoes we wear etc. Some people have firm strong and resilient skin. Others have tender, thin and easily affected skin. The latter type of skin can be toughened to cope and protected for the walk using a number of different taping techniques. Skin temperature also needs to be maintained so that the skin does not become overly sweaty and moist which increases the risk of blisters.

Socks that are designed to ‘wick moisture away’; that is take the moisture away from the skin out through the sock to the other side of the sock, is the best way of managing this.

2. How your foot works

Your foot has two main functions, it has to adapt the body above to the ground beneath, and then has to be stable enough for the body to move over a solid foundation. If these functions are not working properly areas of high pressure develop which can directly cause tissue injury. The most obvious is blisters but also stress fractures and indirectly, increased risk of ligament or tendon damage as muscles get tired; often seen in cases of rolled ankles. Research shows that cushioning insoles can address the direct high-pressure areas, but the reasons why the foot is not functioning properly, causing risk of injury, needs to be understood and then addressed appropriately.

3. The level of friction.

There are many ways people use to reduce friction. For most people the best strategy is wearing well fitted merino padded socks. These socks should have built in padding to assist with small pressure areas.  If you have bony feet, or a tendency for rubbing, wearing two pairs of socks can be the solution. If you often have blisters on or in between your toes, ‘toe socks’, worn under the padded merino socks, can be the answer.

A final note on blisters, if the top of the blister rubs off and you’re left with a red raw sore, a band-aid type of dressing is not a good option as it may cause more friction. Instead, compound dressings are good for this, as is some taping, so long as your skin is not sensitive to the adhesive.

We congratulate everyone who is taking on the Surf Coast trek for the challenge it provides as well as supporting a fantastic local charity which benefits our whole community. Total Care Podiatry is proud to support your effort with a Complimentary Foot & Leg Assessment.

WARNING: This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace professional podiatric advice. Treatment will vary between individuals depending upon your diagnosis and presenting complaint. An accurate diagnosis can only be made following personal consultation with a Podiatrist.

MARATHON RECOVERY

Recovery from any sporting event is critical to injury prevention and must be a component that should be planned into your training program. The main basic steps to follow in the first few days: 

On the day: 

  • Keep warm. Your body will cool down rapidly which is stressful to your cells, so have tracksuit pants and a jumper ready, and get your wet clothes off. 
  • Eat. Protein – bananas, energy bars, sporting drinks, fruit are all good options and will help with recovery. 
  • Ice bath. Later in the day when you get home an ice bath will help with muscular repair. 
  • Walk. A light walk in the evening before going to bed.

Day 1 – 3 of recovery: 

  • Warm bath followed by stretch.

  • Eat, and eat lots. Focus on carbs and protein to refuel.
  • Light massage – no deep tissue at this stage, it will be too much for muscle fibres.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK AGES 65 & OVER – Stretch & Reflect

It is so important to gently warm up and stretch after exercising.

Remember to seek medical advice on the best stretches or strength exercises for your body. And if you notice any pain or discomfort since increasing your activity please call our office to make an appointment today

Remember: Pain does not mean you need to give up, but it is best to seek advice before continuing.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK FOR AGES 65 & OVER- Look closer!

Start by looking at your feet every day.

Use a mirror to check the bottom of your feet. Can you see any cracks, sores, infections, or peeling or dry skin?

This is especially important if you have diabetes or chronic health issues.

SPOT ANYTHING?  See your podiatrist ASAP to avoid unnecessary complications.

8 steps in showing how to inspect feet

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

INTRODUCING OUR NEWEST TEAM MEMBER ~ PODIATRIST CLEMENTINE SCHEFFERS

Clementine Scheffers

Clementine is a graduate of La Trobe University with a Bachelor of Applied Science and Masters of Podiatric Practice.
She is passionate about acute and chronic injury rehabilitation and sports injury management, given her love and passion for sport growing up, as well as managing a chronic injury herself. Clementine has a wealth of knowledge in all things running shoes and will be your go to for shoe advice!
In her spare time, Clementine enjoys listening to her favourite artists and keeping up with the latest music releases, walking her Wheaten Terrier Riley, staying active and spending time with her cousins in Torquay.