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SCHOOL SHOES

Follow these 6 steps when shopping for school shoes for your child:

  1.  There should be a thumb width of room between the longest toe and the end of the shoe (this may be your child’s 2nd toe!)
  2.  Removable insole – A quick way to ensure the shoes are wide enough is to ask your child to stand on the insole.
  3.  There needs to be room for your Pinky finger between the inside of the tongue and the top of your child’s foot
  4. Good fastenings are a must!– this may be velcro, lace up or buckle
  5.  A small heel of 6-10mm is recommended
  6. Comfort first! – your child should feel comfortable in the store when trying the shoes on – take your time!

If you are unsure, come into the clinic – we offer a free back to school check pre term,  for school children with any queries or concerns about their legs or feet. Call 5223 1531 to book.

WARNING
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK – Check their shoes!

Before you begin to encourage your family to move more, check everyone’s shoes still fit well and are fit for purpose.

Kids feet grow fast, so check to see if there is a thumb widths breadth from the longest toe to the tip of the shoe.

The last thing you (or they!) want is to be complaining about sore feet or legs…

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP THREE

Pain can be a subjective experience, yet no matter how it is packaged it shouldn’t be ignored. To avoid pain it is important to have shoes that fit well and are comfortable, since pain in your feet can trigger a ‘chain effect’ of pain elsewhere such as in your hips or knees.

DO

  • Rest tired feet and legs, particularly if you stand for long periods of time
  • Explore what triggers any foot pain and make note of this for your podiatrist
  • Consider applying ice packs to areas of swelling or inflammation

DONT

  • Ignore pain, since it is your body’s way of letting you know something needs investigation
  • Assume hip and knee pain isnt connected to your feet or the way you walk
  • Believe all pain is ‘bad’, your podiatrist may advise you to safely work through your foot pain

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP TWO

Correctly fitted shoes can make a big difference to your foot health. In fact, up to twice your bodyweight in force is applied through your feet and legs with every step. And did you know that your longest toe may not necessarily be your big toe? Bear this in mind when being fitted for shoes.

DO

  • Make sure that there is about 1.5 centimetres (thumb width) of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe
  • Test your shoes on a range of surfaces to see how they feel
  • Check that the widest part of the shoe sits where the ball of your foot is

DONT

  • Underestimate comfort, as evidence shoes that shoe comfort can help reduce the risk of injury
  • Ignore any pain signals. If you have pain in your feet, see your podiatrist
  • forget to check that your shoes bend to keep comfortable

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

IS WEARING HIGH HEELS DAMAGING YOUR FEET? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

Wearing High Heels

High heels place increased load on the forefoot. Over time this can lead to blisters and the development of callus beneath the foot. Soft tissues along the forefoot also can undergo enormous pressure. Increased load may cause stress to these tissues which may lead to injuries such as stress fractures or inflammation to the area.

Additionally, with extended use of high heels, muscles along the posterior of the legs can tighten and reduce the range of motion of joints such as the ankle. This will mean, that when you return to flat shoes, the tendons and other soft tissues undergo a lot of tension and the risk of injury increases.

If you are wearing heels, things to consider:

  • Ensure they fit properly so your foot will not slide when walking
  • Check regularly for irritation to the skin, i.e. blisters and apply dressings as required.
  • Practice walking in the heels to ensure you feel as stable as possible
  • Trial the shoes around the house before events and check for skin irritation and fatigue.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

DIABETES WEEK 12-18th of July 2020

DIABETES

Why are the feet affected?

  • Due to the small size of the blood vessels and distance away from the heart, the feet are most commonly among the 1st to be affected.

Main complications are:

  • Neuropathy (decreased sensation in the feet and symptoms such as burning or tingling)
  • Vascular disease (diabetes affects the bodys ability to maintain healthy blood vessel walls)
  • Infection (the body has a decreased ability to fight bacteria and disease)

Other complications:

  • Changes to foot structure creating areas of high load
  • Changes to the skin and sweating regulation
  • Decreased sensation and reduced balance

Where podiatry fits in:

  • We conduct an annual assessment (or more regular if required) which investigates and monitors changes in
    • Blood flow
    • Nerve sensitivity
    • Foot structure
    • Areas of high load
  • We can provide tailored treatment which may include
    • Nail care
    • Callus reduction
    • Orthotics
    • Footwear recommendations
    • Review of activities
    • Referrals to include a multi-disciplinary and whole body approach to care

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

NAILS AND SKIN CARE AT TOTAL CARE PODIATRY

At Total Care Podiatry your podiatrist will begin by assessing and treating the area of most concern to you and will cut your nails and painlessly remove any callus or corns. The circulation and sensation in your feet will be assessed, as will any lumps and bumps and/or foot dysfunction that may cause pressure points. Excessive pressure areas under your feet and on your toes can lead to corns and calluses or pressure ulcers.

Conditions this service treats & how does it work

Treatments for nail and skin conditions may include:

  • Painless removal of corns and callus and thickened skin
  • Treatment and ongoing advice on preventing cracked heels
  • Ingrown Toenail surgery to remove nail spike or complete removal of nail if clinically indicated.
  • Fungal nail treatments
  • Removal and treatment of plantar warts
  • Custom made silicon toe wedges or splinting to straighten overlapped toes or protect and prevent rubbing of toes.

What are the benefits of this treatment

Corns, calluses and thickened skin are generally symptoms of other problems, so it is important for your podiatrist to examine your feet to work out what could be causing the pressure so they can provide a treatment plan which includes offloading these areas.

Your podiatrist will also provide you with advice on how you can care for your feet to prevent ongoing problems and on whether further treatment is recommended.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

IS YOUR TINY DANCER GOING EN POINTE?

Pre-Pointe Assessment

A specific pre-pointe assessment is recommended before a dancer progresses to pointe work.

The screening will help develop an awareness about correct and incorrect positions which will help the dancer on her/his pathway to going en pointe.

During a pre-pointe assessment, the following is taken into consideration:

  • Foot, ankle and leg strength
  • Joint range
  • Posture and core control
  • Anatomical structure of the foot and compensations
  • Growth and maturity

Once a pre-pointe dancer can correctly perform the assessments, she or he is strong enough to commence pointe work with the guidance from the ballet teacher.
The follow up review helps the dancer improve their strength and mobility for pointe work.

A review every six months is recommended if there are no concerns along the way.

Call our friendly reception team to book your tiny dancer in for a pre-pointe assessment today 5223 1531

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.