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MARATHON RECOVERY

Recovery from any sporting event is critical to injury prevention and must be a component that should be planned into your training program. The main basic steps to follow in the first few days: 

On the day: 

  • Keep warm. Your body will cool down rapidly which is stressful to your cells, so have tracksuit pants and a jumper ready, and get your wet clothes off. 
  • Eat. Protein – bananas, energy bars, sporting drinks, fruit are all good options and will help with recovery. 
  • Ice bath. Later in the day when you get home an ice bath will help with muscular repair. 
  • Walk. A light walk in the evening before going to bed.

Day 1 – 3 of recovery: 

  • Warm bath followed by stretch.

  • Eat, and eat lots. Focus on carbs and protein to refuel.
  • Light massage – no deep tissue at this stage, it will be too much for muscle fibres.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK AGES 65 & OVER – Stretch & Reflect

It is so important to gently warm up and stretch after exercising.

Remember to seek medical advice on the best stretches or strength exercises for your body. And if you notice any pain or discomfort since increasing your activity please call our office to make an appointment today

Remember: Pain does not mean you need to give up, but it is best to seek advice before continuing.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK FOR AGES 65 & OVER- Look closer!

Start by looking at your feet every day.

Use a mirror to check the bottom of your feet. Can you see any cracks, sores, infections, or peeling or dry skin?

This is especially important if you have diabetes or chronic health issues.

SPOT ANYTHING?  See your podiatrist ASAP to avoid unnecessary complications.

8 steps in showing how to inspect feet

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

INTRODUCING OUR NEWEST TEAM MEMBER ~ PODIATRIST CLEMENTINE SCHEFFERS

Clementine Scheffers

Clementine is a graduate of La Trobe University with a Bachelor of Applied Science and Masters of Podiatric Practice.
She is passionate about acute and chronic injury rehabilitation and sports injury management, given her love and passion for sport growing up, as well as managing a chronic injury herself. Clementine has a wealth of knowledge in all things running shoes and will be your go to for shoe advice!
In her spare time, Clementine enjoys listening to her favourite artists and keeping up with the latest music releases, walking her Wheaten Terrier Riley, staying active and spending time with her cousins in Torquay.

SCHOOL SHOES

Follow these 6 steps when shopping for school shoes for your child:

  1.  There should be a thumb width of room between the longest toe and the end of the shoe (this may be your child’s 2nd toe!)
  2.  Removable insole – A quick way to ensure the shoes are wide enough is to ask your child to stand on the insole.
  3.  There needs to be room for your Pinky finger between the inside of the tongue and the top of your child’s foot
  4. Good fastenings are a must!– this may be velcro, lace up or buckle
  5.  A small heel of 6-10mm is recommended
  6. Comfort first! – your child should feel comfortable in the store when trying the shoes on – take your time!

If you are unsure, come into the clinic – we offer a free back to school check pre term,  for school children with any queries or concerns about their legs or feet. Call 5223 1531 to book.

WARNING
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK – Check their shoes!

Before you begin to encourage your family to move more, check everyone’s shoes still fit well and are fit for purpose.

Kids feet grow fast, so check to see if there is a thumb widths breadth from the longest toe to the tip of the shoe.

The last thing you (or they!) want is to be complaining about sore feet or legs…

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP THREE

Pain can be a subjective experience, yet no matter how it is packaged it shouldn’t be ignored. To avoid pain it is important to have shoes that fit well and are comfortable, since pain in your feet can trigger a ‘chain effect’ of pain elsewhere such as in your hips or knees.

DO

  • Rest tired feet and legs, particularly if you stand for long periods of time
  • Explore what triggers any foot pain and make note of this for your podiatrist
  • Consider applying ice packs to areas of swelling or inflammation

DONT

  • Ignore pain, since it is your body’s way of letting you know something needs investigation
  • Assume hip and knee pain isnt connected to your feet or the way you walk
  • Believe all pain is ‘bad’, your podiatrist may advise you to safely work through your foot pain

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP TWO

Correctly fitted shoes can make a big difference to your foot health. In fact, up to twice your bodyweight in force is applied through your feet and legs with every step. And did you know that your longest toe may not necessarily be your big toe? Bear this in mind when being fitted for shoes.

DO

  • Make sure that there is about 1.5 centimetres (thumb width) of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe
  • Test your shoes on a range of surfaces to see how they feel
  • Check that the widest part of the shoe sits where the ball of your foot is

DONT

  • Underestimate comfort, as evidence shoes that shoe comfort can help reduce the risk of injury
  • Ignore any pain signals. If you have pain in your feet, see your podiatrist
  • forget to check that your shoes bend to keep comfortable

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

IS WEARING HIGH HEELS DAMAGING YOUR FEET? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

Wearing High Heels

High heels place increased load on the forefoot. Over time this can lead to blisters and the development of callus beneath the foot. Soft tissues along the forefoot also can undergo enormous pressure. Increased load may cause stress to these tissues which may lead to injuries such as stress fractures or inflammation to the area.

Additionally, with extended use of high heels, muscles along the posterior of the legs can tighten and reduce the range of motion of joints such as the ankle. This will mean, that when you return to flat shoes, the tendons and other soft tissues undergo a lot of tension and the risk of injury increases.

If you are wearing heels, things to consider:

  • Ensure they fit properly so your foot will not slide when walking
  • Check regularly for irritation to the skin, i.e. blisters and apply dressings as required.
  • Practice walking in the heels to ensure you feel as stable as possible
  • Trial the shoes around the house before events and check for skin irritation and fatigue.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

DIABETES WEEK 12-18th of July 2020

DIABETES

Why are the feet affected?

  • Due to the small size of the blood vessels and distance away from the heart, the feet are most commonly among the 1st to be affected.

Main complications are:

  • Neuropathy (decreased sensation in the feet and symptoms such as burning or tingling)
  • Vascular disease (diabetes affects the bodys ability to maintain healthy blood vessel walls)
  • Infection (the body has a decreased ability to fight bacteria and disease)

Other complications:

  • Changes to foot structure creating areas of high load
  • Changes to the skin and sweating regulation
  • Decreased sensation and reduced balance

Where podiatry fits in:

  • We conduct an annual assessment (or more regular if required) which investigates and monitors changes in
    • Blood flow
    • Nerve sensitivity
    • Foot structure
    • Areas of high load
  • We can provide tailored treatment which may include
    • Nail care
    • Callus reduction
    • Orthotics
    • Footwear recommendations
    • Review of activities
    • Referrals to include a multi-disciplinary and whole body approach to care

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.