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SOCCER INJURIES

SOCCER INJURIES

Developmental/Youth

Calcaneal Apophysitis (Sever’s)
In young children aged 8-14 years old, commonly boys, the heel bone goes through a growth
phase which can include significant inflammation to its growth plate. When a child is more
active, particularly if wearing hard shoes such as football boots this condition may be further
aggravated because of the firmness of the heel counter on a boot.

Osgood Schlatter’s Disease
A childhood overuse injury also commonly coinciding with growth phases/growth spurts that causes a painful lump below the kneecap due to the pull of the quadriceps muscle at its insertion. This knee injury is common in sports like soccer.

Acute

Ankle Sprains
Soccer players are one of the most common athletes to experience ankle sprains (medial or
lateral) due to the multiple direction changes required in their play, including jumping and
landing (often in an uneven manner or in physical contact with other players), planting, pivoting, turning and stepping. The simple technique of kicking the ball involves external rotation of the foot (abduction) and lateral loading (inverting) of the foot. Any inversion of the foot places the foot at risk of an inverted/lateral ankle sprain ie “common ankle roll”. The lateral ankle sprain is the second most common Soccer injury. This can damage ligaments on the outside of the ankle and sideline a player for many weeks. Contrastingly any pivoting, contest or aspects of the game like jumping can result in a less common excessive eversion causing an everted ankle sprain (medial ankle sprain).
Contusions and bone bruises often result from high impact contact with other players such as in slide tackling, or having the toe box of your boot stepped on resulting in a very sore toe! It is helpful to be aware of the difference in pain levels between a contusion or bony bruise as opposed to a structural or soft tissue injury. In an acute impact, usually if an injury is more significant it is noticed straight away and is of a higher severity than the ache caused by a bruise that develops much later hours to days after an impact that is less painful in its initial incident.

Stress Fracture
Also seen as an overuse injury for athletes frequently training under high activity loads, common stress fractures for soccer player (ie partial breaks to bones) occur at the second and fifth metatarsals, tibia (medial malleolus), and fibula (lateral malleolus).

Overuse 

Calf strain, pull or tear

In soccer there is great susceptibility to muscle strains particularly to the calf due to the often
explosive changes in direction, high running load and rapid acceleration and deceleration involved in the sport, as well as towards the end of a game (fatiguing conditions) placing a great load on the calf muscle. The calf muscle, aka Triceps Surae is made up of the two headed Gastocnemius (upper calf portion) Soleus (lower/mid calf portion) and Plantaris muscle. Soleus strains are often  lateral.

Gastrocnemius strains are often medial. The Gastrocnemius medial head is most prone to a tear.
Calf strains are graded 1-3, with a grade 3 tear the most painful resulting in inability to contract the calf and a much longer recovery time. This injury can best be prevented by an assessment of calf strength, function, ankle joint mobility and other examinations by your Podiatrist to determine if preventative treatment is necessary.

Achilles Tendonitis/Tendinopathy

Soccer requires a lot of plyometric force through the back of the calf, from the power required
for short bursts and sprint work, to jumping for a header. Sometimes, if you are in a very flat
soled boot with minimal heel height; all the motion above can place a strain on your achilles.
Over time, if training loads are not carefully managed, the Achilles tendon can experience wear
and tear and can become inflamed either at its mid portion or at its end where it inserts to the
bone. In the instance of an acute injury to the Achilles, this tendon can rupture if an incident of
high plyometric load is instigated in an unstable position. This injury often occurs with a “pop”
sound.

Knee Meniscus injury or tear
Repeated lateral or forceful movement involving the knee joint can place the knee at a high risk
of damage or tear to the meniscus, a spongy triangle shaped wedge of cartilage that acts as
your knee’s natural shock absorber. Although commonly an injury that occurs as a result of
degeneration from overuse (ie many years of soccer), an acute meniscus tear can occur as a
result of excessive twisting of the knee whilst in a flexed position (ie tackling or changing
direction).

Turf Toe
A strain of the ligaments surrounding the big toe can be caused by the frequent tackling, planting and stopping of the foot, toe-first into ground.

Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (MTSS)/(Shin Splints)
Pain is felt in the lower ⅓ of the inside of the shin (ie not the front of the shin lower to the knee-this is a different issue). MTSS is a common injury related to running or plyometric activity overload ie overtraining, or a rapid change to training type or intensity. Many factors are involved in the cause of this condition, which you should discuss with your Podiatrist if you are concerned you have MTSS.

Subungual Haematoma (Ie bruise under toenail) 
If soccer boots are too small or a player is repeatedly jamming the top of the toes (commonly
big toe) into the end or top of their boot during contest, the nail bed underneath a toenail can
bleed due to the excessive pressure and cause pain.

Blisters
Poorly fitted soccer boots or playing on a wet field in winter can cause blisters to the feet. See
your Podiatrist at Total Care for blister prevention tips and the best type of socks to wear on
field!

One key aspect of any Soccer player’s training to protect the foot and lower limb from injury
should place focus on balance and proprioceptive work to ensure the best possible strength for
single leg weight-bearing.

Other tips include:
 Warming up thoroughly before training or play

 Ensure to always wear protective shin pads, try a thicker sock, and make sure boots are
comfortable and fit well

 Do a pre play field check for anything like uneven ground, debris, stones or puddles!

 Allow sufficient time off field and off training when you have had an injury, avoiding
rushing back into your original training load as this can enhance re-injury risk.

Feel free to book into the clinic with one of our Podiatrists for an injury risk assessment. If you
have had an injury in your sport, come and see us for your rehabilitation program so you can get back to the field as soon as possible!

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ANKLE PAIN ~ Check out our latest blog for more information!

ANKLE PAIN

Ankle pain is a common source of foot pain that can be as a result of an acute, one-off trauma injury to the ankle, repeated injury and overuse to the ankle joint and its surrounding anatomy, or also from degenerative changes to the ankle over time. However, there are other reasons as to why you may be suffering from ankle pain.

 

Ankle pain can also be in different regions of the ankle due to the number of bones that form the ankle joint.

 

The ankle joint is also known as the Talocrural Joint; formed by the connection between the Fibula (outside leg bone), Tibia (inside leg bone/shin bone), and Talus, a small bone that sits in the mortise shaped socket formed by the Fibula and Tibia. The end of the Tibia (your “inside ankle bone”) is called the Medial Malleolus, the end of the Fibula (your “outside ankle bone”) is called the Lateral Malleolus. The most common fracture to either of these bones is a lateral malleolus fracture.

 

 

General Ankle Joint pain

à Generalised, non localised pain to the whole ankle joint

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Osteoarthritis: Cartilage degeneration
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis : Inflammation to joint lining causing cartilage degeneration
  • An arthritic joint is frequently noticed by stiffness to the joint

 

Ankle pain

 

Lateral Ankle pain

à Pain on the outer side of your ankle

Commonly caused by an acute incident, but can be of gradual nature

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Ligament injuries (tear or rupture) : Anterior Talofibular (ATFL), Calcaneofibular (CFL), Posterior talofibular (PTFL)
  • High Ankle Sprain aka Syndesmosis Injury: Ligament injury to Distal Tibiofibular Ligament (ligament connecting your main leg bone/shin bone, to your outer leg bone)
  • Peroneal Tendinopathy/Tendinitis
  • Peroneal Subluxation/Dislocation
  • Fracture : Cuboid, 5th metatarsal “Jones” fracture or Lateral Malleolusankle lateral ligaments trauma pain location lateral inversion trauma inversion

 

Medial Ankle pain

à Pain on the inner side of your ankle

Usually due to overuse, ie “wear and tear”

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome or Medial Calcaneal Nerve Entrapment
  • Tibialis Posterior Tendinopathy
  • Ligament injury: Deltoid ligament
  • Flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy

Photo: Location of Tibialis Posterior Syndrome

Anterior Ankle Pain

–>Pain on the top of the foot at the front of your ankle joint

 

Common Diagnoses

  • Anterior Ankle Impingement

-Often due to Bone Spur formation

-Common in Soccer players or Dancers

-Often intense, sharp pain

  • Osteochondral lesion at Talar Dome
  • Tibialis Anterior Tendinopathy/Tendinitis
  • Extensor Retinaculum restriction/injury

Location of Pain in Anterior Ankle Impingement

 

The above information is informative only, see your Podiatrist for a detailed examination to determine what may be the cause of your ankle pain or injury, to diagnose correctly and form a comprehensive treatment plan to get you back and moving!

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

*Sources

https://orthopaedia.com/page/Anatomy-of-the-Foot-Ankle

https://www.completepaincare.com/patient-education/conditions-treated/ankle-pain/

https://www.physiocheck.co.uk/condition/4/lateral-ankle-ligament-injury

https://www.physioroom.com/injuries/ankle_and_foot/tibialis_posterior_syndrome_full.php

MARATHON RECOVERY

Recovery from any sporting event is critical to injury prevention and must be a component that should be planned into your training program. The main basic steps to follow in the first few days: 

On the day: 

  • Keep warm. Your body will cool down rapidly which is stressful to your cells, so have tracksuit pants and a jumper ready, and get your wet clothes off. 
  • Eat. Protein – bananas, energy bars, sporting drinks, fruit are all good options and will help with recovery. 
  • Ice bath. Later in the day when you get home an ice bath will help with muscular repair. 
  • Walk. A light walk in the evening before going to bed.

Day 1 – 3 of recovery: 

  • Warm bath followed by stretch.

  • Eat, and eat lots. Focus on carbs and protein to refuel.
  • Light massage – no deep tissue at this stage, it will be too much for muscle fibres.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK AGES 65 & OVER – Stretch & Reflect

It is so important to gently warm up and stretch after exercising.

Remember to seek medical advice on the best stretches or strength exercises for your body. And if you notice any pain or discomfort since increasing your activity please call our office to make an appointment today

Remember: Pain does not mean you need to give up, but it is best to seek advice before continuing.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

IT’S IN THE WAY YOU WALK…Check out our latest blog for more information

FEEL THE BALANCE

A persons gait simply refers to the way they stand, walk or run. An abnormal gait can be caused by one or more parts of the body (such as the hips or knees) under-performing, which can lead to imbalances elsewhere in the body. A podiatrist will analyse the way you walk to help identify any imbalances or areas of weakness.

THE DOMINO EFFECT

Did you know that a podiatrist doesn’t just study the feet during gait analysis? Let’s say you are suffering from hip pain, this could be related to the way you walk. Or your feet might turn inwards or outwards, and the compensation your muscles have to make to keep you upright can actually be the cause of your pain. Your podiatrist can explain how all these elements relate to each other and back to YOU!

THE WEAKEST LINK

The way you walk can reveal which parts of your body are perhaps weaker than others. Did you know that compensations in the body can lead to imbalance around the joints and the main muscles – such as hamstrings, glutes, quads and calves? These observations can all tie in with hip, knee, foot and ankle pains. This means those areas may become less active and end up contributing less than should. A gait analysis can reveal these kinds of issues and more.

 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

SCHOOL SHOES

Follow these 6 steps when shopping for school shoes for your child:

  1.  There should be a thumb width of room between the longest toe and the end of the shoe (this may be your child’s 2nd toe!)
  2.  Removable insole – A quick way to ensure the shoes are wide enough is to ask your child to stand on the insole.
  3.  There needs to be room for your Pinky finger between the inside of the tongue and the top of your child’s foot
  4. Good fastenings are a must!– this may be velcro, lace up or buckle
  5.  A small heel of 6-10mm is recommended
  6. Comfort first! – your child should feel comfortable in the store when trying the shoes on – take your time!

If you are unsure, come into the clinic – we offer a free back to school check pre term,  for school children with any queries or concerns about their legs or feet. Call 5223 1531 to book.

WARNING
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP THREE

Pain can be a subjective experience, yet no matter how it is packaged it shouldn’t be ignored. To avoid pain it is important to have shoes that fit well and are comfortable, since pain in your feet can trigger a ‘chain effect’ of pain elsewhere such as in your hips or knees.

DO

  • Rest tired feet and legs, particularly if you stand for long periods of time
  • Explore what triggers any foot pain and make note of this for your podiatrist
  • Consider applying ice packs to areas of swelling or inflammation

DONT

  • Ignore pain, since it is your body’s way of letting you know something needs investigation
  • Assume hip and knee pain isnt connected to your feet or the way you walk
  • Believe all pain is ‘bad’, your podiatrist may advise you to safely work through your foot pain

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Want to know how to best care for your feet? Here’s how you can show your feet some more love, which can even benefit your overall health!

TIP TWO

Correctly fitted shoes can make a big difference to your foot health. In fact, up to twice your bodyweight in force is applied through your feet and legs with every step. And did you know that your longest toe may not necessarily be your big toe? Bear this in mind when being fitted for shoes.

DO

  • Make sure that there is about 1.5 centimetres (thumb width) of space between your longest toe and the end of the shoe
  • Test your shoes on a range of surfaces to see how they feel
  • Check that the widest part of the shoe sits where the ball of your foot is

DONT

  • Underestimate comfort, as evidence shoes that shoe comfort can help reduce the risk of injury
  • Ignore any pain signals. If you have pain in your feet, see your podiatrist
  • forget to check that your shoes bend to keep comfortable

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GROWING PAINS?

Growing Pains?

Is pain most commonly affecting the legs during adolescence. This pain most often occurs at afternoon to night time and will affect the muscles. 

Growing pains is defined as pain in the muscles and not the bones or joints. Often it is genralised muscle pain which is often described as non-specific pain.

There are many theories as to why it occurs. The first theory is that due to large amounts of growth in a short time, there is an increased effort for the leg muscles to work and so pain occurs. The second is that the muscles fatigue due to overuse in active children. Lastly, there may be a psychological aspect to the pain development within the brain. 

Growing pains is linked to obesity, lowered pain thresholds, decreased bone strength and is more prevalent in children who suffer migraines. 

The symptoms will include being bilateral, pain in the late afternoon or evening, intermittent pain with some pain free days and is most likely be in the calf or quad muscles.

If the symptoms are unilateral, persistent, within joint or persistent until the next morning, see your doctor immediately.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

CAR ACCIDENT AND THE LOWER LIMBS – What can podiatry do?

Car accident and the lower limbs

Trauma to the lower limbs will cause varying degrees of symptoms and/or disability depending on the location and severity of the injury. In some causes a nerve may be heavily injured which will result changes to sensation and muscle function. This is particularly evident in injuries to the outside knee. There are very vulnerable nerves in this location which innervate the muscles of the lower limb. This may lead to muscle inactivity and/or weakness.

What can podiatry do?

We look at the muscle strength and the impact any changes will have on lower limb function. Depending on individual circumstance, the presentation may require a foot or ankle orthotic, strengthening program or footwear recommendations and alterations.
Most often injuries like this involve a multi-disciplinary team approach with occupational therapists, physiotherapists and/or exercise physiologist. 

We strive to help achieve the best possible outcomes for the patient and focus on improving quality of life. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.