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IS WEARING HIGH HEELS DAMAGING YOUR FEET? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

Wearing High Heels

High heels place increased load on the forefoot. Over time this can lead to blisters and the development of callus beneath the foot. Soft tissues along the forefoot also can undergo enormous pressure. Increased load may cause stress to these tissues which may lead to injuries such as stress fractures or inflammation to the area.

Additionally, with extended use of high heels, muscles along the posterior of the legs can tighten and reduce the range of motion of joints such as the ankle. This will mean, that when you return to flat shoes, the tendons and other soft tissues undergo a lot of tension and the risk of injury increases.

If you are wearing heels, things to consider:

  • Ensure they fit properly so your foot will not slide when walking
  • Check regularly for irritation to the skin, i.e. blisters and apply dressings as required.
  • Practice walking in the heels to ensure you feel as stable as possible
  • Trial the shoes around the house before events and check for skin irritation and fatigue.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

BLISTERS…why do they occur and prevention

Blisters form due to repetitive friction and trauma to the skin.

They are most commonly caused by rubbing or friction from footwear applying pressure to the foot and overloading the soft tissue during activity.A blister forms as a clear fluid filled lesion within the outer layers of the skin.

What to do:
– If the blister is closed; keep the blister protected (with a dressing), do not ‘pop’ the blister and reduce activity/change footwear.
– If the blister opens, apply antiseptic (e.g. betadine) to the area and a dressing. Reduce activity and monitor the blister for signs of infection. If any signs of infection occur contact your doctor.

Prevention

  • Appropriate shoe fit and style
  • Double layered socks and/or moisture wicking socks
  • Tapes/dressings
  • Paddings
  • Lubricant

Long term treatment

  • Footwear change
  • Biomechanical assessment to investigate areas of high pressure
  • Sock choice
  • Activity modification
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.