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CAR ACCIDENT AND THE LOWER LIMBS – What can podiatry do?

Car accident and the lower limbs

Trauma to the lower limbs will cause varying degrees of symptoms and/or disability depending on the location and severity of the injury. In some causes a nerve may be heavily injured which will result changes to sensation and muscle function. This is particularly evident in injuries to the outside knee. There are very vulnerable nerves in this location which innervate the muscles of the lower limb. This may lead to muscle inactivity and/or weakness.

What can podiatry do?

We look at the muscle strength and the impact any changes will have on lower limb function. Depending on individual circumstance, the presentation may require a foot or ankle orthotic, strengthening program or footwear recommendations and alterations.
Most often injuries like this involve a multi-disciplinary team approach with occupational therapists, physiotherapists and/or exercise physiologist. 

We strive to help achieve the best possible outcomes for the patient and focus on improving quality of life. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

HOW MANY PHALANGES DOES A HUMAN HAVE?

56 phalanges!

There are 56 phalanges (bones) in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two. 
The phalanges of the fingers help us manipulate our environment while the phalanges of the foot help us balance, walk, and run.

Phalanges have many attachments such as muscles (via tendons), ligaments and other soft tissue.

Treatment of Toe Fractures

Fractures of the toe bones are almost always traumatic fractures. Treatment for traumatic fractures depends on the break itself and may include these options:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is all that is needed to treat a traumatic fracture of the toe.
  • Splinting. The toe may be fitted with a splint to keep it in a fixed position.
  • Rigid or stiff-soled shoe. Wearing a stiff-soled shoe protects the toe and helps keep it properly positioned. Use of a postoperative shoe or bootwalker is also helpful.
  • Buddy taping the fractured toe to another toe is sometimes appropriate, but in other cases, it may be harmful.
  • Surgery. If the break is badly displaced or if the joint is affected, surgery may be necessary. Surgery often involves the use of fixation devices, such as pins

Consequences of Improper Treatment

Some people say that “the doctor can’t do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is usually not true. In fact, if a fractured toe or metatarsal bone is not treated correctly, serious complications may develop. For example:

  • A deformity in the bony architecture, which may limit the ability to move the foot or cause difficulty in fitting shoes.
  • Arthritis, which may be caused by a fracture in a joint (the juncture where two bones meet), or may be a result of angular deformities that develop when a displaced fracture is severe or has not been properly corrected.
  • Chronic pain and deformity.
  • Non-union, or failure to heal, can lead to subsequent surgery or chronic pain.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

 

 

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

DO YOU NEED A CAM WALKER? AKA MOON BOOT

What is it?

  • The sole purpose of a Cam Walker, commonly known as a ’’moon boot’’ is to limit mobility in the foot and ankle.

Type of injuries?/How long?

  • You may be temporarily prescribed a cam walker by your Podiatrist if you have an acute or chronic injury that needs rest for a period of time, but still allows you to walk. Examples of injuries could include ankle sprains, achilles injuries or even to take pressure off an ulcerated area of the foot.
  • The time required for each individual will vary however a typical injury may result in needing to wear the Cam Walker for 2-8 weeks.

Did you know??

  • As the boot has a thick sole, this often leads to symptoms in the back or hips.
  • We will provide you with an ‘Even-up’, which aims to help level you up in order to reduce the chance of further problems.

Important to know

  • As the Cam Walker’s sole purpose is to reduce movement at the time of injury to allow for healing, it is extremely important that proper rehabilitation follows this stage.
  • Your Podiatrist will guide you towards a suitable management plan, to help reduce chance of future complications.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

FEET AND ANKLE INJURY FREE -WHILST SMASHING OUT HIIT SESSIONS

Due to the nature of HIIT (high intensity interval training), certain stresses may be placed on the feet and ankles, especially if this is a new form of exercise for you.

It is important to build the strength in your legs prior to engaging in HIIT training, as movements are often rapid and repetitious. It can place excessive pressure on your joints if your HIIT workouts are too frequent, and you do ‘too much too soon’, like many other activities. There are specific modifications that your trainer may be able to suggest if you have any concerns. Correct technique is crucial, so it is necessary for you and your trainer to be on top of this, to avoid injury.
Should you develop an injury, seek medical advice as soon as possible.

Be sure to wear appropriate footwear. When buying athletic footwear for your HIIT workout, stick with a ‘neutral’ shoe, unless it has been otherwise suggested by your health professional.
The shoe should have a firm heel counter (doesn’t fold right down if you try to push it with your fingers). The shoe should have a moderate amount of cushioning (without it being too heavy), for good shock attenuation to reduce the amount of force on the feet and legs. The softer the outer sole however, the faster it will compress, which we want to avoid.

If you do not feel as you are being adequately ‘supported’ or have enough cushioning, try altering your footwear. If this doesn’t change anything, there may be other things that your Podiatrist can manage or educate you with.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

MEET THE FRONT DESK TEAM @ TOTAL CARE PODIATRY

At Total Care Podiatry our front desk team guides your first steps into the care we strive to give all our patients.

Our office manager Emily Meek and her team of Suzy Purtill and Kate Wombwell many years experience of service in private health practice. Their care and attention to detail is focused on our patients’ needs.

Our Practice Manager, Rae-Ellen Graham has worked for over 30 years in administration management and is also our shoe fitter and orthotic technician.

MEET PODIATRIST & OWNER – PAUL GRAHAM

Paul has been a podiatrist in private practice since 1987 with a special interest in musculoskeletal conditions. He is a fellow of the Australasian Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine and has recently become the first podiatrist admitted as a member of the Pain Society of Australia.

The focus of his practice has always been on comprehensive, evidence based examination and diagnosis of the underlying causes of presenting symptoms, to achieve the best possible outcome for each patient.

Paul is also a trainer of Clinical Plantar Pressure Analysis, teaching practitioners in many countries around the world how to use plantar pressure technology effectively in clinical practice.

If you wish for Paul Graham to speak at your next event please call 5223 1531 to arrange a time.

INGROWN NAIL SURGERY

Nail surgery is a common procedure performed by most podiatrists to effectively treat an ingrown toenail: a nail that has pierced (or is pressing against) the adjacent skin of the toe causing pain and inflammation and sometimes infection.

Conditions this service treats

Surgery may be required when an ingrown toenail repeatedly gets infected, is continually painful, when the patient is unable to wear shoes or the condition inhibits work, sporting or other activities.

Before surgery is recommended, your podiatrist will explore other, more conservative treatment options.

How does the treatment work?

A ‘Partial Nail Avulsion’ (known as a PNA or nail root and matrix resection) is a minor nail procedure performed under local anaesthetic. The offending portion of the nail is gently lifted and trimmed away, generally without the toe being cut or stitched. Both sides or the entire nail may be removed this way. A chemical may also be used, at this point, to assist in preventing nail regrowth.

Prior to ingrown nail surgery your podiatrist will conduct a complete assessment, taking a medical history, a list of any medications that have been prescribed for you, as well as considering any other clinical factors that will determine whether or not this surgery is suited to you. An assessment will generally also include an examination of blood supply to the foot.

What are the benefits of this treatment

Ingrown nail surgery aims to permanently treat ingrown toenails The procedure is performed in the podiatrists’ rooms and takes around one hour. You will be able to walk immediately afterwards, however, you will need to have someone take you home after the procedure.

As with any surgical procedure there is some risk of complication, however, this procedure is known to be very safe and effective.
The most common side-effects are post-operative infection, in the short term, and the possibility of regrowth of the nail over time. The risks of infection can be minimised through good post-operative care and your podiatrist will advise and assist with your after surgery care.

WARNING
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

MEET RACHEL VALE – TOTAL CARE PODIATRY’S NEWEST TEAM MEMBER

We’re excited to welcome Rachel Vale to our team at Total Care Podiatry.

Rachel has had a lifelong passion for podiatry with interest in biomechanics, general foot care and nail surgeries. She enjoys working in paediatrics and strives to create tailored treatment plans for her patients.

Growing up in Geelong, Rachel has always had an interest in sports, particularly volleyball and basketball. Her interest in sports has helped her treat both acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions. Outside of work she enjoys spending time with family, going to the gym and watching movies.

To make your next appointment with Rachel please contact our friendly reception team on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.