Posts

IS WEARING HIGH HEELS DAMAGING YOUR FEET? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

Wearing High Heels

High heels place increased load on the forefoot. Over time this can lead to blisters and the development of callus beneath the foot. Soft tissues along the forefoot also can undergo enormous pressure. Increased load may cause stress to these tissues which may lead to injuries such as stress fractures or inflammation to the area.

Additionally, with extended use of high heels, muscles along the posterior of the legs can tighten and reduce the range of motion of joints such as the ankle. This will mean, that when you return to flat shoes, the tendons and other soft tissues undergo a lot of tension and the risk of injury increases.

If you are wearing heels, things to consider:

  • Ensure they fit properly so your foot will not slide when walking
  • Check regularly for irritation to the skin, i.e. blisters and apply dressings as required.
  • Practice walking in the heels to ensure you feel as stable as possible
  • Trial the shoes around the house before events and check for skin irritation and fatigue.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

LIVING WITH ARTHRITIS? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

ARTHRITIS

There are 3 types of arthritis that commonly affect the feet

Osteoarthritis

 Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis

 Rheumatoid Arthritis
Gout

 Gout

These will most likely affect the big toe of the foot and lead to degeneration of the joint.

Over time this may lead to structural changes of the joint and reduce range of motion.

Reduced range of motion will decrease the body’s ability to adapt to forces loaded to the area and impinge on the normal function of
the joint.

Symptoms
Reduced range of motion
Visible changes to the joint
Pain in the joint and/or surrounding soft tissue
Change in walking gait

Treatment is to help decreased pain and maintain the joint’s range of motion.

This may include
Mobilisation
Soft tissue therapy
Orthotics
Exercise prescription
Footwear recommendations

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

IS YOUR TINY DANCER GOING EN POINTE?

Pre-Pointe Assessment

A specific pre-pointe assessment is recommended before a dancer progresses to pointe work.

The screening will help develop an awareness about correct and incorrect positions which will help the dancer on her/his pathway to going en pointe.

During a pre-pointe assessment, the following is taken into consideration:

  • Foot, ankle and leg strength
  • Joint range
  • Posture and core control
  • Anatomical structure of the foot and compensations
  • Growth and maturity

Once a pre-pointe dancer can correctly perform the assessments, she or he is strong enough to commence pointe work with the guidance from the ballet teacher.
The follow up review helps the dancer improve their strength and mobility for pointe work.

A review every six months is recommended if there are no concerns along the way.

Call our friendly reception team to book your tiny dancer in for a pre-pointe assessment today 5223 1531

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR NEXT VISIT

Are your feet happier after visiting one of our expert podiatrists?

Would you like to receive 10% off your next visit? 

Take a moment to like us and write a review on our face book page and receive 10% off your next visit with us ( you can even do this whilst in our waiting room!)

To claim your 10% please show are staff at the front desk during payment your like and review

 

 

 

 

FEET AND ANKLE INJURY FREE -WHILST SMASHING OUT HIIT SESSIONS

Due to the nature of HIIT (high intensity interval training), certain stresses may be placed on the feet and ankles, especially if this is a new form of exercise for you.

It is important to build the strength in your legs prior to engaging in HIIT training, as movements are often rapid and repetitious. It can place excessive pressure on your joints if your HIIT workouts are too frequent, and you do ‘too much too soon’, like many other activities. There are specific modifications that your trainer may be able to suggest if you have any concerns. Correct technique is crucial, so it is necessary for you and your trainer to be on top of this, to avoid injury.
Should you develop an injury, seek medical advice as soon as possible.

Be sure to wear appropriate footwear. When buying athletic footwear for your HIIT workout, stick with a ‘neutral’ shoe, unless it has been otherwise suggested by your health professional.
The shoe should have a firm heel counter (doesn’t fold right down if you try to push it with your fingers). The shoe should have a moderate amount of cushioning (without it being too heavy), for good shock attenuation to reduce the amount of force on the feet and legs. The softer the outer sole however, the faster it will compress, which we want to avoid.

If you do not feel as you are being adequately ‘supported’ or have enough cushioning, try altering your footwear. If this doesn’t change anything, there may be other things that your Podiatrist can manage or educate you with.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

MEET THE FRONT DESK TEAM @ TOTAL CARE PODIATRY

At Total Care Podiatry our front desk team guides your first steps into the care we strive to give all our patients.

Our office manager Emily Meek and her team of Suzy Purtill and Kate Wombwell many years experience of service in private health practice. Their care and attention to detail is focused on our patients’ needs.

Our Practice Manager, Rae-Ellen Graham has worked for over 30 years in administration management and is also our shoe fitter and orthotic technician.

AFTERPAY IS HERE!

Shop now, pay it in 4!

Love AfterpayWe‘ve got it!  No waiting for treatment, Afterpay has it covered and you pay it back fortnightly.

Same day orthotic service available.

Pay for your purchase over 4 easy instalments, with an interest-free payment schedule from Afterpay. You’ll receive handy notifications when your payment is close to due and no fees when you pay on time

Afterpay – Shop now. Wear now. Pay later. Interest-free!*

Afterpay offers interest-free payment plans for your purchases online and in-store. Buy and receive what you want today and pay it off in four instalments fortnightly.

To make a purchase using Afterpay you will need:

  • A debit or credit card
  • To be over 18 years of age
  • An Australian residential address

Before your visit to our practice:

  • Download the Afterpay app.
  • Sign in or follow the steps to create your Afterpay account.*
  • Make sure to add your payment details.
  • The front desk girls will then simply scan the barcode prior to the purchase being completed.

*A brief pre-approval process may be required and you may be asked to provide your Drivers License or Medicare card to verify your identity.

* If a payment is due from you but not received by Afterpay in accordance with the payment schedule, a $10 late payment fee will be charged, with a further $7 late payment fee added seven days later if the payment remains unpaid.

#AFTERPAYIT

For more information about Afterpay terms and conditions, visit the Afterpay website.

https://www.afterpay.com/en-AU/index

 

MEET PODIATRIST & OWNER – PAUL GRAHAM

Paul has been a podiatrist in private practice since 1987 with a special interest in musculoskeletal conditions. He is a fellow of the Australasian Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine and has recently become the first podiatrist admitted as a member of the Pain Society of Australia.

The focus of his practice has always been on comprehensive, evidence based examination and diagnosis of the underlying causes of presenting symptoms, to achieve the best possible outcome for each patient.

Paul is also a trainer of Clinical Plantar Pressure Analysis, teaching practitioners in many countries around the world how to use plantar pressure technology effectively in clinical practice.

If you wish for Paul Graham to speak at your next event please call 5223 1531 to arrange a time.