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DIABETES WEEK 12-18th of July 2020

DIABETES

Why are the feet affected?

  • Due to the small size of the blood vessels and distance away from the heart, the feet are most commonly among the 1st to be affected.

Main complications are:

  • Neuropathy (decreased sensation in the feet and symptoms such as burning or tingling)
  • Vascular disease (diabetes affects the bodys ability to maintain healthy blood vessel walls)
  • Infection (the body has a decreased ability to fight bacteria and disease)

Other complications:

  • Changes to foot structure creating areas of high load
  • Changes to the skin and sweating regulation
  • Decreased sensation and reduced balance

Where podiatry fits in:

  • We conduct an annual assessment (or more regular if required) which investigates and monitors changes in
    • Blood flow
    • Nerve sensitivity
    • Foot structure
    • Areas of high load
  • We can provide tailored treatment which may include
    • Nail care
    • Callus reduction
    • Orthotics
    • Footwear recommendations
    • Review of activities
    • Referrals to include a multi-disciplinary and whole body approach to care

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

FEET AND ANKLE INJURY FREE -WHILST SMASHING OUT HIIT SESSIONS

Due to the nature of HIIT (high intensity interval training), certain stresses may be placed on the feet and ankles, especially if this is a new form of exercise for you.

It is important to build the strength in your legs prior to engaging in HIIT training, as movements are often rapid and repetitious. It can place excessive pressure on your joints if your HIIT workouts are too frequent, and you do ‘too much too soon’, like many other activities. There are specific modifications that your trainer may be able to suggest if you have any concerns. Correct technique is crucial, so it is necessary for you and your trainer to be on top of this, to avoid injury.
Should you develop an injury, seek medical advice as soon as possible.

Be sure to wear appropriate footwear. When buying athletic footwear for your HIIT workout, stick with a ‘neutral’ shoe, unless it has been otherwise suggested by your health professional.
The shoe should have a firm heel counter (doesn’t fold right down if you try to push it with your fingers). The shoe should have a moderate amount of cushioning (without it being too heavy), for good shock attenuation to reduce the amount of force on the feet and legs. The softer the outer sole however, the faster it will compress, which we want to avoid.

If you do not feel as you are being adequately ‘supported’ or have enough cushioning, try altering your footwear. If this doesn’t change anything, there may be other things that your Podiatrist can manage or educate you with.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

MEET THE FRONT DESK TEAM @ TOTAL CARE PODIATRY

At Total Care Podiatry our front desk team guides your first steps into the care we strive to give all our patients.

Our office manager Emily Meek and her team of Suzy Purtill and Kate Wombwell many years experience of service in private health practice. Their care and attention to detail is focused on our patients’ needs.

Our Practice Manager, Rae-Ellen Graham has worked for over 30 years in administration management and is also our shoe fitter and orthotic technician.

MEET PODIATRIST & OWNER – PAUL GRAHAM

Paul has been a podiatrist in private practice since 1987 with a special interest in musculoskeletal conditions. He is a fellow of the Australasian Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine and has recently become the first podiatrist admitted as a member of the Pain Society of Australia.

The focus of his practice has always been on comprehensive, evidence based examination and diagnosis of the underlying causes of presenting symptoms, to achieve the best possible outcome for each patient.

Paul is also a trainer of Clinical Plantar Pressure Analysis, teaching practitioners in many countries around the world how to use plantar pressure technology effectively in clinical practice.

If you wish for Paul Graham to speak at your next event please call 5223 1531 to arrange a time.

PREGNANCY AND YOUR FEET

Production of hormones during pregnancy have enormous effects on your feet. The most significant change to feet during pregnancy is relaxation of ligaments which may cause ankle and foot instability and bit you at a greater injury risk

·Weight gain which is an obvious expectation during pregnancy puts a greater load through feet and lower legs

·There is also a centre of gravity shift as your baby grows which alters posture of not only your body but your feet!

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

INGROWN NAIL SURGERY

Nail surgery is a common procedure performed by most podiatrists to effectively treat an ingrown toenail: a nail that has pierced (or is pressing against) the adjacent skin of the toe causing pain and inflammation and sometimes infection.

Conditions this service treats

Surgery may be required when an ingrown toenail repeatedly gets infected, is continually painful, when the patient is unable to wear shoes or the condition inhibits work, sporting or other activities.

Before surgery is recommended, your podiatrist will explore other, more conservative treatment options.

How does the treatment work?

A ‘Partial Nail Avulsion’ (known as a PNA or nail root and matrix resection) is a minor nail procedure performed under local anaesthetic. The offending portion of the nail is gently lifted and trimmed away, generally without the toe being cut or stitched. Both sides or the entire nail may be removed this way. A chemical may also be used, at this point, to assist in preventing nail regrowth.

Prior to ingrown nail surgery your podiatrist will conduct a complete assessment, taking a medical history, a list of any medications that have been prescribed for you, as well as considering any other clinical factors that will determine whether or not this surgery is suited to you. An assessment will generally also include an examination of blood supply to the foot.

What are the benefits of this treatment

Ingrown nail surgery aims to permanently treat ingrown toenails The procedure is performed in the podiatrists’ rooms and takes around one hour. You will be able to walk immediately afterwards, however, you will need to have someone take you home after the procedure.

As with any surgical procedure there is some risk of complication, however, this procedure is known to be very safe and effective.
The most common side-effects are post-operative infection, in the short term, and the possibility of regrowth of the nail over time. The risks of infection can be minimised through good post-operative care and your podiatrist will advise and assist with your after surgery care.

WARNING
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

MEET RACHEL VALE – TOTAL CARE PODIATRY’S NEWEST TEAM MEMBER

We’re excited to welcome Rachel Vale to our team at Total Care Podiatry.

Rachel has had a lifelong passion for podiatry with interest in biomechanics, general foot care and nail surgeries. She enjoys working in paediatrics and strives to create tailored treatment plans for her patients.

Growing up in Geelong, Rachel has always had an interest in sports, particularly volleyball and basketball. Her interest in sports has helped her treat both acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions. Outside of work she enjoys spending time with family, going to the gym and watching movies.

To make your next appointment with Rachel please contact our friendly reception team on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

TELEHEALTH – WHO IS IT FOR?

TeleHealth

Total Care Podiatry now has two ‘TELEHEALTH’ options if you are unable to leave your home:

  1. As a community service at this time we have made available three Complimentary TeleHealth Advice sessions per week. This service is about 10 minutes to answer general questions and provide you with advice. It is particularly good if you are a New Patient who needs some help to manage until you’re able to attend the clinic.
  2. TeleHealth Consultation. For existing patients who are unable to attend the clinic. Using secure  software our podiatrists will be able to provide online:
  • a video conference for you to explain your concerns and receive clinical advice,  and, if required
  • an exercise and rehabilitation program of video demonstrations within the Physitrack App.

This will enable us to adjust your treatment plan from the comfort of your own home.

The billing for these will be the same as usual for NDIS and Veterans. For patients with a Chronic Diseases Management plan (for Medicare rebates) we are able to bulk bill with a new Item number provided by Medicare. For private patients the Fee is $30. Some health funds are providing a rebate for TeleHealth consultations. Check with your Health Fund.

If you’re not sure about whether TeleHealth is right for you please give us a call  on 5223 1531 to discuss your situation.

If you have any questions,  concerns or special requirements please give us a call on 5223 1531 and we’ll do our best to help you.

Call 5223 1531 to book

TeleHealth at Total Care Podiatry

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

CALF RAISES – WHY ARE THEY IMPORTANT?

Whatever your level of activity or whatever age you are,  EVERYONE will benefit from Calf Raise exercises.

  • Ankle strength and foot stability
  • Lower leg strength to propel us forward in motion
  • Prevent injury particularly for athletes
  • The more explosive the activity – the more crucial calf strength is!

Your calf complex is made up of your soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. They help us in every day activities including simply walking. Strong calf muscles enable us to jump, skip and run with more force and will prevent injury with these activities too!

Some basic calf exercises

Stand with your toes pointing straight ahead and feet slightly apart. Raise onto your toes for a count of 4, hold for a count of 2 and slowly descend for a count of three. Repeat for 2 minutes 3 – 4 times per week.

Stand with your feet at 45 degrees with the heels together. Raise onto your toes for a count of 4, hold for a count of 2 and slowly descend for a count of three. Repeat for 2 minutes 3 – 4 times per week.

Stand with your feet at 45 degrees with the Big toes together. Raise onto your toes for a count of 4, hold for a count of 2 and slowly descend for a count of three. Repeat for 2 minutes 3 – 4 times per week.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.