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KNOCK KNEES – When to book an appointment to see your podiatrist?

Knock knees

Also known as genu valgus, is when the knees ‘face each other’.

This position commonly occurs between the ages of 3 to 4 and will slowly reduce or ‘straighten up’ with age. 

When to book an appointment

  • Asymmetry
  • Any pain
  • Outside of age for stage
  • Excessive knock knees
  • Level of activity is affected 
  • The child is ‘clumsy’ or unbalanced

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY – Who does it affect? Read our latest blog to find out more!

Achilles Tendinopathy

Tendinitis (inflammation), Tendinosis (degenerative) or Rupture

The Achilles tendon attaches the muscles of the calf to the calcaneus (heel bone). This tendon undergoes a lot of stress due to the amount of tension and forces it withstands. Over time, if the amount of stress to this tendon is too great, it may lead to an injury to the area and pain to develop. Most commonly, there will be a single event or injury that will cause the pain to start. 

Symptoms

  • May have started from an event/injury
  • Pain on movement or palpation
  • Swelling of the ankle
  • Bruising in the area

When injured, treatment of the Achilles tendon involves progressively loading the tissue as it best reacts to load. Repeated stimulation allows the tendon to properly heal and return to its ideal state

Treatment is tailored to each patient and their unique presentation

Treatment may include:

  • Surgery (if a rupture occurs)
  • Moonboot
  • Heel lifts
  • Exercise program
  • Activity modifications
  • THOR Laser
  • Taping
  • Orthotics
  • Footwear Recommendations
  • Activity Modification

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

DIABETES AND SUMMER – If you have reduced feeling in your feet this blog is for you!

Diabetes and summer

Previously discussed in these blogs was the effect of diabetes on the sensitivity of nerves. Over time, the nerves may have reduced sensitivity causing numbness and a loss of protective sensation.

When this happens, there are certain things to consider to ensure your safety in summer. During the mid-summer heat, concrete becomes particularly warm and may cause burns to occur on the bottom of the feet. If you have reduced sensation, you may not feel any burning of the skin.

To be safe:

  • Wear enclosed shoes when outside at all times
  • Check feet regularly for any changes or cuts
  • Avoid risk factors such as standing on/near hot surfaces

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

BALL OF FOOT SORE? You may have Morton’s Neuroma

Neuroma

Is a condition where pain is caused by compression of the nerves between two bones. Most commonly in the foot this is a Morton’s Neuroma which occurs between the third and forth metatarsophalangeal joints.

Most often, the tissues in and around the nerves at these locations become inflamed and swell between the bones. The changes to the nerves may have been caused by mechanical irritation to the nerve and/or compression by the surrounding soft tissues.

Symptoms

–          Burning or tingling pain down the toes

–          Pain which may radiate up the leg

–          Pain worse in high heels or shoe that are tight across the forefoot

Treatment

–          Footwear recommendations

–          Rest

–          THOR laser

–          Offloading with padding and/or orthotics

–          Activity modification

–          If severe, surgery may be considered

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

IS WEARING HIGH HEELS DAMAGING YOUR FEET? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

Wearing High Heels

High heels place increased load on the forefoot. Over time this can lead to blisters and the development of callus beneath the foot. Soft tissues along the forefoot also can undergo enormous pressure. Increased load may cause stress to these tissues which may lead to injuries such as stress fractures or inflammation to the area.

Additionally, with extended use of high heels, muscles along the posterior of the legs can tighten and reduce the range of motion of joints such as the ankle. This will mean, that when you return to flat shoes, the tendons and other soft tissues undergo a lot of tension and the risk of injury increases.

If you are wearing heels, things to consider:

  • Ensure they fit properly so your foot will not slide when walking
  • Check regularly for irritation to the skin, i.e. blisters and apply dressings as required.
  • Practice walking in the heels to ensure you feel as stable as possible
  • Trial the shoes around the house before events and check for skin irritation and fatigue.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

NARROW FITTING SHOES CAN CAUSE FOOT DAMAGE TO YOUR TOOTSIES! Check out our latest blog for more information…

Narrow Fitting Shoes

When purchasing shoes, always ensure there is enough width around the toes. If a shoe is too narrow, it can lead to blisters and callus or corn development. Over time, the toes can become crowded and lead to pressure spots to develop.

Common problem shoe types

  • Slipper/’Slip ons’ or flats
  • Loader
  • Court

What to look for in a shoe

  • Enough width along the toes
  • ‘Thumbs width’ from your big toe to the end of the shoe
  • Only flexes at the toes
  • There is a strap or laces to hold your foot in the shoe
  • Go shopping at the end of the day 
  • Do not expect your shoes to ‘wear in’, only buy if they are comfortable on the day 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

LIVING WITH ARTHRITIS? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

ARTHRITIS

There are 3 types of arthritis that commonly affect the feet

Osteoarthritis

 Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis

 Rheumatoid Arthritis
Gout

 Gout

These will most likely affect the big toe of the foot and lead to degeneration of the joint.

Over time this may lead to structural changes of the joint and reduce range of motion.

Reduced range of motion will decrease the body’s ability to adapt to forces loaded to the area and impinge on the normal function of
the joint.

Symptoms
Reduced range of motion
Visible changes to the joint
Pain in the joint and/or surrounding soft tissue
Change in walking gait

Treatment is to help decreased pain and maintain the joint’s range of motion.

This may include
Mobilisation
Soft tissue therapy
Orthotics
Exercise prescription
Footwear recommendations

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – check out our latest blog for treatment recommendations

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from high forces at the end range of motion of a joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces.

Different sports will carry higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing and when pain started
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
  • Activity modification

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

‘W’ SITTING – WHAT IS IT & WHY SHOULD I CORRECT IT?

W-Sitting

‘W-Sitting’ is where a child sits on the floor with their knees out forward and their legs splayed outwards to replicate a ‘W’. During their young age, sitting positions and activities will play a large role in the development of their lower limbs. ‘W-sitting’ particularly affects the hips and surrounding soft tissue such as ligaments and muscles.

This position encourages internal rotation of the hips and loosening these soft tissues to maintain this posture. These changes may also alter the child’s walking pattern. Internally rotated hips may result in a ‘pigeon-toed’ or with ‘knees pointing inwards’ while the child walks. The child may experience clumsiness, fatigue or lack of confidence in their walking and during sports. 

What can we do about it?
Encourage proper seating postures such as sitting ‘crossed legged’, this position externally rotates the legs and allows for proper development.  As well as doing activities which strengthen posterior muscles (such as the gluteals) are encouraged.

If your child experiences these symptoms, an assessment with a podiatrist may be required.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – Symptoms & Treatment

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from over-extension joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces. Most commonly these injuries will occur during high impact activity with different sports carrying higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing 
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Activity modification
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
    • Laser treatment

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.