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FIVE SIGNS YOUR CHILD MAY HAVE A FOOT PROBLEM

Five Signs your Child may have a Foot Problem

 

In-toeing or tripping

Usually, sometimes thought of as the internal rotation of the foot but formally known as Metatarsus Adductus, Metatarsus Adductus is usually picked from birth at the very latest into the first year of growth but if left undetected may be a cause of in-toeing along with other things like an Internal Genicular (Knee) Position, Internal Tibial Torsion or Femoral torsion from the hip. It is best to get these things checked from the age of birth to the age of 6 to ensure nothing that needs to be treated is left untreated. 

 

Limping, pain, or withdrawing from or lagging behind in activities

If your child complains of foot or lower leg pain that lasts longer than an initial trip or fall or a few days, you should get your child assessed. 

 

Growing pains

For some children, growing pains may be more abnormal and associated with a Hypermobility joint syndrome which is best understood early to prevent excessive strain, pain or injury as well as some abnormal foot structures that can be associated with more profound growing pains. 

 

Your child is lagging in developmental milestones or has awkward gait

Although these may be not associated directly with foot problems, children require a stable foundation from the feet to allow basic motor skills as early as birth to first steps. If your child has some abnormality in their foot structure or alignment as discussed above, some of these motor skill milestones may be delayed; if not due to other red flags such as potential neuromuscular conditions. It is great to see your Paediatric nurse or Podiatrist if you have concerns.  

 

Tip toe walking

It is normal in the first few years of growth for a child to walk on their tip toes as they become accustomed to the confidence of walking. However, beyond the age of 3 if this continues it can suggest the potential for tightness and pain through the calf muscles if not treated, issues with growth phases, or also the potential for a developmental or intellectual condition diagnosis.  

Think your child has a foot problem? See our friendly Podiatrists for our monthly free Paediatric foot check and screening held on a Wednesday each month. Contact our helpful Reception team for details, you can also get a referral from your Paediatric nurse. PH: 52231531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

CHILDREN’S INJURED FEET

Children’s Injured Feet

Problems causing injury to paediatric feet are often correlated with the maturity level of bone development and can be categorized based on the age of your child. 

The following may predispose a child to a gradually developed injury: 

  • Congenital anomalies
  • Variation in development
  • Bone maturation
  • Lower leg alignment 

… but otherwise, given the nature of children with high physical activity levels, acute injury to the foot can occur. 

What does pain/injury look like, sometimes if subtle in a child?

It is important to be aware of the difference in pain presentation between older and younger children. 

Toddlers and young children: a child may limp, tire easily or refuse to walk or weightbear due to pain or injury. 

Older children and adolescents: their ability to compensate or isolate the pain may be better so injuries may go along unnoticed for a longer period. 

Acute vs Developmental Injury

Acute injuries are more likely in children (the younger they are) to result in stress reactions or fractures to the bone and often at the growth plate, rather than ligamentous strain or injury due to the fact children are undergoing stages of bone maturation as they develop into early adolescence and have relatively stronger ligaments than adults. 

Growth Phases

If your child is noticeably fatiguing or lagging behind other children, it is important to get an understanding of what may be the cause, and a Podiatric initial assessment can be a great starting point, to rule out any biomechanical insufficiences or growth abnormalities that for any reason haven’t been picked up on.  

When children go through growth phases, muscles can become fatigued easily as they can tug at the ends of the bone as the bone lengthens and grows; resulting in discomfort and fatigue not unlike the traditionally known “growing pains”. 

Common Paediatric specific injuries to the foot include: 

Sever’s Disease (Apophysitis of insertion of Achilles tendon into Calcaneus/heel bone)Age: 7-14

-Commonly known as children’s heel pain-pain at the back of the heel towards the bottom, associated with children experiencing growth phases. 

Osgood Schlatter’s (Apophysitis of insertion of Patellar Ligament into Tibial tuberosity)

Age: Ages 10-14

-Painful lump growth just below the kneecap, associated with children experiencing growth phases but more common in children playing sports involving running and jumping. 

Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) 

Age: Anywhere from 6 months to 16 years of age

-Joint pain, stiffness and inflammation or region warmth most commonly affecting the Ankle Joint as well as other joints in the body. 

Osteochrondritis Dissecans (OCD)

Age: Children & Adolescents 

-Often affecting the ankle after an ankle sprain or injury where a reduction in blood supply to the bone region affected causes a small fracture. The fragment of bone may remain attached or become detached. 

Sesamoiditis or Sesamoid Pathology

-Pain under the ball of the big toe joint which can be due to inflammation of the two sesamoid bones (small pebble sized bones situated under the metatarsal head that allow the gliding effect of the tendon of the muscle that flexes the big toe downward). 

-A common sporting injury in young athletes who push off the ball of the foot such as in jumping sports, ballet or karate. 

A reminder, Total Care Podiatry has a monthly free Paediatric Screening clinic where your Podiatrist will run through a free assessment to check on developmental norms in your child. We ask that to book into this clinic, a small donation be made to Kids Plus foundation upon attending. Kids Plus offers programs that include early treatment and specific intervention strategies to improve children’s abilities across a range of developmental areas. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

Some information from today’s blog obtained from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2323000/

Complimentary Paediatric Clinic ~ Wednesday the 23rd of June 2021

Complimentary Paediatric Clinic 

Every month at Total Care Podiatry we run a complimentary morning clinic to support the little feet that run around our community. We run short appointments designed to be a screening check of any areas of concern you may have for your child’s feet. 

Commonly we check for: 

  • ‘Tired legs’
  • Being clumsy
  • Walking ‘pigeon-toed’
  • Curly toes
  • ‘Flat feet’

Following a short appointment, we can provide some advice for next steps forward. These may include a more in depth follow up appointment, footwear recommendations or activity changes.

Bookings are essential – please phone our friendly staff on 5223 1531 to secure your free paediatric appoint today

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GOING SKIING THIS SEASON? Make sure you fit your ski boots correctly to avoid injury!

Vital tips when it comes to Rental Ski Boots and Footwear at the snow this year

Ski boots are one of the most important pieces of equipment and a properly fitting boot will make a large difference in your skiing experience.
Ski boots are measured in Mondo sizes (Mondo (or mondopoint) sizing is basically the length of your foot in centimeters.
It is important to remember that ski boots should not fit like a pair of shoes. You want them to be tight and secure in order to maximize performance, stability and safety.
Most injuries and pain to the foot while skiing/snowboarding occur because of a boot that is too big.
Getting the sizing right goes a long way towards a comfortable time on the slopes.
Make sure to take the time with our ski boot fitting, to ensure that you can have a great day on the mountain.

Do’s

  • Wear loose-fitting pants that can be rolled up
    • Ski socks should be the only thing in your ski boots
  • A quality ski sock is made of wool or synthetic fibers.
  • Buckle up the boots before you make a fitting decision
    • Buckling up the boot will put your foot in the correct position in the boot
  • Walk around in the boot to better ensure you have a good fit
    • Keep them on while you look at skis or accessories
  • Flex your boot forward so that your foot slides into the proper ski position
    • You will naturally be flexed when you ski
  • Attach the Power Strap Firmly
    • The power strap should always be on while skiing

Don’ts

  • Wear multiple pairs of socks
    • This will cause friction in the boot, take up more space, and reduce breathability
  • Wear ankle or cotton socks
    • Your socks should come up above the top of the ski boot
  • Be afraid if your toes are touching the front
    • In a proper fit, your toes should be touching the front when you are upright
  • Choose a boot based on the color
    • Comfort over color!
  • Over tighten your bottom buckles
    • The top buckles are the ones that keep your ankle in place, not the bottom ones
  • Try on a boot based on your shoe size
    • Measure in Mondo size or centimeters
  • Forget that ski boots will continue to pack down
    • Even used ski boots will continue to break in

Don’t Forget to trim your Toenails!

Your feet probably aren’t accustomed to the tight fit of a ski boot and being slammed into the end of the toe box.
Protect your nails from damage and ingrown toenails by trimming your nails short and straight across.

If you are experiencing pain and/or discomfort during or after skiing please call us for an assessment today PH: 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

FOOTWEAR FEATURES IN RUNNING SHOES FOR COMMON FOOT CONDITIONS AND PATHOLOGIES

Footwear Features in running shoes for common foot conditions and pathologies

It is crucially important that we have a shoe that supports our feet in the right way and suits our personal needs and activity requirements. and no, by support this does not just mean arch support!

Our personal needs are not limited to our foot type and gait but include our injury history (both specific to the foot and upper body), our preferences based on previous shoe experiences, and the use of orthotics or other mechanical aids such as AFOs or Heel Lifts.

If you are doing a lot of activity for your occupation or lifestyle that involves walking or weightbearing, a pair of running shoes is a key shoe to have in your rotation due to its technologically advanced foam composition in the sole to provide a cushioning system to absorb the impact of your body weight as well as it’s stability features. Some of the features explained below for running shoes can also be replicated in other suitable, more formal footwear.

REARFOOT AND MIDFOOT PAIN

Such as…

ACHILLES PAIN

  • Commonly, avoid flat, thin soled shoes. A flatter soled shoe will stretch the achilles to its maximum and apply significant tension to the calf muscle, which if already inflamed will aggravate under this environment significantly.
  • So, ensure a high heel height (that is, the heel height, aka HHD or heel pitch is higher in reference to the thickness of the shoe sole at the forefoot). This does not mean wear high heeled shoes, but it does mean go for a pair of runners with at least a 12mm heel height differential. (Standard HHD is 10mm).

HEEL PAIN

Our heel, also known as our calcaneus, is essentially our first point of contact with the ground in most cases hence rarely gets a break. Plantar heel pain is a common condition that is exacerbated by excessive pressure to the heel and hard surfaces. Common conditions such as Plantar Fasciitis may be assisted by the following tips:

 

  • Commonly, avoid flat, thin soled shoes. Try a higher heel height in your shoes to offload pressure from the heel and create distance between the ground/hard surface you are walking on.
  • Most importantly, go for a premium cushioned shoe! Despite advertising’s best efforts, comfort wear shoes such as Sketchers are made up of a foam that does not last a long time with our body weight’s load and will compress, losing its structural integrity and shock absorption capacities.
  • Premium cushioning is best met with a running shoe using an EVA or Polyurethane foam composition, which has much more elastic or “spring back” energy to absorb your impact and ease strain to the heel.

 

ARCH PAIN

To relieve pain on our arch, shoes cannot specifically relieve pain.

  • However, a shoe with a more rigid density foam reinforced to the inside arch of the shoe will support the arch, which may reduce the potential of the foot to excessively pronate (roll in), given that sometimes excessive pronation can place greater strain on our arch and be one of the contributing factors to arch pain.

Caution: If your arch pain is quite tender and inflamed, a shoe with a significant density to the arch in initial stages may aggravate symptoms.

ANKLE PAIN & INSTABILITY

Ankle joint recurrent instability issues can be due to a number of causes. If your joints are hypermobile this can extend your joint’s motion to a range further than it should ie a maximum inversion ankle sprain. If your ligaments are loose, worn from previous injury or stretched over time; they will allow greater movement hence not protecting the joint from entering a risky range of motion.

Essentially, our shoes need to reduce motion laterally to the ankle joint! The bad news is, there are very few shoes that automatically are able to do this.

 

Important features that can help combat excessive motion by providing stability are:

  • Rigid last-the platform or sole of the shoe should be rigid and only bend at the toes. This means no Sketchers, “Nike Free Runs” or other shoes that simply fold in half (give your shoes the test today!). A flexible shoe has too much give to it, and will collapse and compress laterally underneath your body’s natural movement pathway, especially if your muscles and ligaments are weak and quite prone to ankle sprains/rolls.

 

  • Wide last-a wider last or shoe that has a lateral rearfoot flare ie flared shape of the shoe sole at the rearfoot section of the midsole/shoe sole, will allow greater total surface area contact with the ground, enhancing your balance and proprioception (awareness of your foot’s contact with the ground) hence enabling you to react more easily and more quickly if you roll your ankle.

 

FOREFOOT PAIN

  • Cushioning or added thickness to the forefoot section of the shoe sole will take pressure off an inflamed forefoot.
  • Adding a gel full length insole to your shoe is a second way to add shock absorption to the area to ease pressure from the ground up

 

Such as….

 

MORTON’S NEUROMA

-Wide fitting shoe in the toebox is crucial. Also try a loose fitting material. No pointed toe shoes!

Compression to either side of the forefoot either by a tight shoe material or simply a shoe that is too narrow will squeeze the inflamed nerve and elevate symptoms.

BUNIONS

-A wide fitting shoe is important, but did you know, a wide last in a shoe is also helpful?

Put simply, the platform or sole of your shoe should ultimately be slightly wider than the extent of your bunion’s bony prominence, as should the mesh have some airspace surrounding the bunion.

A wide last can also be attained by going for a pair of runners with a flaring to the outsides of the forefoot section of the shoe midsole/sole.

*RESOURCE – The bunion institute

 

1ST METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS

-Big toe joint sore and not as mobile as it used to be? Consult your Podiatrist for an appointment to discuss this. You may have Osteoarthritis in your big toe joint (this is the joint at the “knuckle” of your big toe, not the joint that bends the tip of your toe).

-Try a shoe with a rocker bottom or a very rigid sole (aka a shoe with a sole that bends minimally at the crease of the forefoot where a shoe normally bends for your toes). Reducing excessive motion at a joint with already limited motion is likely to help relieve osteoarthritic joint pain. Brands include: Hoka, New Balance, Asics, Chung Shi

LOWER BACK PAIN

Posturally, lower back issues can be aggravated by a higher heel on a shoe.

  • A shoe with a relatively neutral heel height or low heel height may put less strain on the posterior chain of the body. Consult your upper body health professional for further advice on your specific lower back condition as our spinal column is one with a multitude of anatomy and lower back pain can mean many things! Some people find symptoms alternatively alleviated with a slight heel.

Still unsure? Book in an appointment with your Podiatrist to have a Footwear Assessment and we can help you narrow down the most suitable shoes for your feet. We also have a number of partnerships and connections with shoe stores and shoe brands local and afar, to which we can direct you to their friendly teams for a new pair under our advice!

Phone our friendly front desk team today to make an appointment PH: 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

WHAT RUNNER IS SUITED TO MY FOOT SIZE AND SHAPE?

What runner is suited to my foot size and shape? 

The choice we make in deciding on an appropriate pair of runners for walking or running can be made in relation to many features of our feet.

First and foremost to address is the size and shape of our feet. 

Our feet can change in size or length, shape and width across the time of our lifespan, including as you age. 

So it is important to get your size and width remeasured each time or every second time you get fit for shoes. 

 

Here are my top tips for fitting shoes to feet of all shapes and sizes!

 

  1. A rule of thumb- test that you have one thumb’s width of airspace compressible just beyond your longest toe in a shoe. 

This allows for the change in size to your foot: 

-When you are more active as your foot slides forward in a shoe

-When your feet swell up during physical exercise 

 

Source: https://www.blister-prevention.com/optimal-shoe-fit/

 

NARROW FEET

–> Ensure the fit of your shoe is secure through the heel and ankle, snug through midfoot and be cautious not to overpull laces too tight across the forefoot as we do require some wriggle room for any foot shape at the toes. 

-The sole or platform of the shoe in a curved last shape may assist to contour your midfoot as visible below

 

-In runners and some dress shoes, for women this means a 2A width (Narrow) and for men in very select shoe styles this means a B width (Narrow). 

-Note that regardless of a shoe’s stated width, some shoestyles may fit more narrow than others-speak to your trusted footwear professional instore for any particular shoe styles that suit!

 

Some of my favourites are:

  • Asics Gel DS Trainer 
  • Asics Glideride 
  • Brooks Ravenna
  • Brooks Transcend 
  • Brooks Adrenaline 2A (or B Width for mens)
  • Asics GT 2000 2A Width (or D width for mens fits more snug) 
  • Nike Pegasus 
  • Mizuno Wave Rider (fits very generously through the forefoot though)
  • Saucony Guide (fits very generously through forefoot though)
  • Brooks Levitate 
  • New Balance Fuel Cell Prism 
  • Brooks Glycerin 17 
  • Hoka Clifton 

 

Lacing technique tip: Lock lace by use of the extra eyelet at your ankle to secure heel and ankle into back of shoe, hugging a narrow heel and preventing slipping around inside. You can always ask your Podiatrist how to lock lace at your next appointment! There are other techniques available for narrow feet. 

 

WIDE FEET or feet with Bunions

–> It’s simple-ensure a wider fitting shoe! If you’re not sure when trying shoes on, compress the sides of the shoe on your foot and if you feel tightness or bony prominences-always if in doubt-go wider!

-The sole or platform of the shoe being wider also helps ie a straight lasted shoe such as visible below

Source: http://hub.therunningworks.net/running-shoes-everything-you-need-to-know/

 

Bunions are a change in alignment of our 1st or 5th Metatarsophalangeal joint that over time can create painful bony prominences to both sides of our forefoot. Excessive pressure to this joint deformity caused by narrow shoes can exacerbate the deformity and pain associated. 

 

It is most helpful upon fitting a shoe to test with your hands by compressing the sides of the shoe. The best case scenario is that there is an air bubble of space surrounding your bunion. 

 

In runners and some dress shoes, for women this means a D width (Wide) or 2E width (Extra Wide) 

For men this means a 2E width (Wide) or 4E width (Extra Wide) 

 

Some of my favourites are:

  • Brooks Dyad or Brooks Addiction 
  • New Balance 940 
  • Saucony Echelon
  • Asics Fortitude 8 
  • Asics Gel Pursue
  • Asics GT 4000 
  • New Balance 880
  • New Balance Fresh Foam Moar 
  • Mizuno Wave Inspire D/2E Width (good for forefoot width) 
  • Hoka Bondi D/2E Width
  • Hoka Gaviota 

 

Lacing technique tip: Start the shoe lacing from the 2nd eyelet from the front of the shoe, skipping the first to ensure the tightest point of fit is not across your bunion joint region. 

 

BROAD FEET, HIGH ARCHED FEET or feet with ORTHOTICS

–> Ensure adequate shoe depth

This will prevent: 

-A feeling of tightness or restriction across the top of your foot when you tie up the laces or fixate your shoe closed

-Heel slippage-commonly occurs in shoes that are too shallow to fit an orthotic. 

 

TOE DEFORMITIES and TOE ALIGNMENT

The toebox of a shoe in a closed toe shoe is the area encompassing all your toes. 

Some brands like Frankie 4 stock shoes with various toe box shapes to suit different toe alignments.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Toe_box_size.jpg

 

Tips:

-Ensure adequate shoe depth and width in the “toebox” of the shoe

i.e.  Avoid pointed toe shoes 

 

Source: https://www.somfootwear.com/blogs/news/wide-toe-box-shoes

 

This will prevent: 

-Pressure to the tops of claw or hammer toes, to prevent further deformity, pain, callous or corn formation. 

-Prevent interdigital pressure between toes and the formation of bunions. 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

FISIOCREM ~ What is it?

Fisiocrem is a topical pain relief gel that you can rub into your skin to temporarily ease muscular aches. Used on muscle and joint injuries such as muscle tears and sprains such as ankle sprains.

So it’s used like you would use deep heat, tiger balm and the like.

You get no yucky residue on the skin after applying and the scent and feel of it is not too intense & smells fresh!

Fisiocrem has natural plant-based ingredients in it like Arnica, Hypericum (more commonly known as St John’s Wort) and Calendula.

While we often prescribe Fisiocrem when people are recovering from injuries, there are other uses for Fisiocrem too. Once your pain has relieved, there’s no need to put your Fisiocrem in the cupboard to be forgotten about!

Extra uses for your Fisiocrem:

Post work out soreness

Nothing feels as good as smashing out a gym workout! But the thought of walking the stairs the next day after 1000 squats? No thanks! Sometimes DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) can be a real pain! Have you considered Fisiocrem to get you through those post work out feels? Fisiocrem is popular with athletes, helping them to recover so they can continue to train hard.

Arthritis

Calendula is known to help with inflammation. Arthritis is an inflammatory condition of the joints and effects many people. Fisiocrem can be a nice addition to medications, especially when the pain is debilitating. Rubbing Fisiocrem into affected joints may help with temporary relief of arthritic pain, so you can get on with your day.

Bruises

Fisiocrem has the active ingredient Arnica in it. There has been some research to suggest that applying a topical cream with Arnica in it may help reduce bruises. With the combined ingredients of Calendula, the pain of bruising may be also be reduced quicker!

Stress

When you’re feeling stressed you might notice your shoulders creeping up to your ears. Massaging some Fisiocrem around the shoulders and the neck can help you take a moment to relax.

 

Total Care Podiatry stocks Fisiocrem in 2 sizes 120g $25.00 &  60g $17.50

Drop in and see the team at 209 Malop Street Geelong or call 5223 1531 for more information

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

TOTAL CARE PODIATRY ~ FREE FAMILY FOOT CLINIC 9th July 2021

Free family foot clinic!

Friday 9th July 2021

15 minute FREE assessment & advice

Please arrive on time to help our family clinic run on time

Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed

Call our friendly reception staff today to secure your appointment 5223 1531

 

MARATHON RECOVERY

Recovery from any sporting event is critical to injury prevention and must be a component that should be planned into your training program. The main basic steps to follow in the first few days: 

On the day: 

  • Keep warm. Your body will cool down rapidly which is stressful to your cells, so have tracksuit pants and a jumper ready, and get your wet clothes off. 
  • Eat. Protein – bananas, energy bars, sporting drinks, fruit are all good options and will help with recovery. 
  • Ice bath. Later in the day when you get home an ice bath will help with muscular repair. 
  • Walk. A light walk in the evening before going to bed.

Day 1 – 3 of recovery: 

  • Warm bath followed by stretch.

  • Eat, and eat lots. Focus on carbs and protein to refuel.
  • Light massage – no deep tissue at this stage, it will be too much for muscle fibres.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

GETTING BACK ON TRACK AGES 65 & OVER – Stretch & Reflect

It is so important to gently warm up and stretch after exercising.

Remember to seek medical advice on the best stretches or strength exercises for your body. And if you notice any pain or discomfort since increasing your activity please call our office to make an appointment today

Remember: Pain does not mean you need to give up, but it is best to seek advice before continuing.

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

*Source foothealthaustralia.org.au

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.