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TOENAIL BRUISING AND INJURY

Toenail bruising and injury

Bruising of the toenails is very common. It can occur because of an injury (i.e. dropping something on it) or from repetitive stress to the area. This is frequently occurring in ballet dancers and football players due to the nature of their activities.

When to see a podiatrist?

–          If it causes any pain

–          If the nail breaks, thickens, cracks or lifts from the nail bed

–          If the bruising is not going away

–          If the bruising has defined borders or occurs in a strip

Depending on the presentation and cause for the changes to the nail, the podiatrist may:

–          Cut and file the nail

–          Monitor it for changes

–          Offload the area with paddings and/or orthotics

–          Provide footwear recommendations

–          Activity modifications

 

 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

CORNS AND CALLUS – what are they and treatment

Corns and Callus

Callus is the thickening of the skin on the hands and feet. On the feet, callus forms as a reaction from repeated high areas of pressure. This mechanism is to protect the skin from breaking down. Over time however this may lead to discomfort and bruising around the callus.

Corns are similar to callus but they mostly form over joints where there is a focused centre to the pressure. Due to this pressure, the callus forms a nucleus at this location which can become sensitive and painful.

Podiatrist can ‘shave’ down the callus and remove the painful centre of the corns. 

They may also recommend an offloading device to reduce the pressure at those locations.
This can be achieved through:

  • Taping
  • Orthotics
  • Foam or gel pads
  • Toe sleeves

#toesleeves

 

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, please call us today for an appointment on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

LIVING WITH ARTHRITIS? Check out our latest blog to find out more!

ARTHRITIS

There are 3 types of arthritis that commonly affect the feet

Osteoarthritis

 Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis

 Rheumatoid Arthritis
Gout

 Gout

These will most likely affect the big toe of the foot and lead to degeneration of the joint.

Over time this may lead to structural changes of the joint and reduce range of motion.

Reduced range of motion will decrease the body’s ability to adapt to forces loaded to the area and impinge on the normal function of
the joint.

Symptoms
Reduced range of motion
Visible changes to the joint
Pain in the joint and/or surrounding soft tissue
Change in walking gait

Treatment is to help decreased pain and maintain the joint’s range of motion.

This may include
Mobilisation
Soft tissue therapy
Orthotics
Exercise prescription
Footwear recommendations

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – Symptoms & Treatment

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from over-extension joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces. Most commonly these injuries will occur during high impact activity with different sports carrying higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing 
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Activity modification
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
    • Laser treatment

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

HOW MANY PHALANGES DOES A HUMAN HAVE?

56 phalanges!

There are 56 phalanges (bones) in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two. 
The phalanges of the fingers help us manipulate our environment while the phalanges of the foot help us balance, walk, and run.

Phalanges have many attachments such as muscles (via tendons), ligaments and other soft tissue.

Treatment of Toe Fractures

Fractures of the toe bones are almost always traumatic fractures. Treatment for traumatic fractures depends on the break itself and may include these options:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is all that is needed to treat a traumatic fracture of the toe.
  • Splinting. The toe may be fitted with a splint to keep it in a fixed position.
  • Rigid or stiff-soled shoe. Wearing a stiff-soled shoe protects the toe and helps keep it properly positioned. Use of a postoperative shoe or bootwalker is also helpful.
  • Buddy taping the fractured toe to another toe is sometimes appropriate, but in other cases, it may be harmful.
  • Surgery. If the break is badly displaced or if the joint is affected, surgery may be necessary. Surgery often involves the use of fixation devices, such as pins

Consequences of Improper Treatment

Some people say that “the doctor can’t do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is usually not true. In fact, if a fractured toe or metatarsal bone is not treated correctly, serious complications may develop. For example:

  • A deformity in the bony architecture, which may limit the ability to move the foot or cause difficulty in fitting shoes.
  • Arthritis, which may be caused by a fracture in a joint (the juncture where two bones meet), or may be a result of angular deformities that develop when a displaced fracture is severe or has not been properly corrected.
  • Chronic pain and deformity.
  • Non-union, or failure to heal, can lead to subsequent surgery or chronic pain.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

 

 

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

DO YOU NEED A CAM WALKER? AKA MOON BOOT

What is it?

  • The sole purpose of a Cam Walker, commonly known as a ’’moon boot’’ is to limit mobility in the foot and ankle.

Type of injuries?/How long?

  • You may be temporarily prescribed a cam walker by your Podiatrist if you have an acute or chronic injury that needs rest for a period of time, but still allows you to walk. Examples of injuries could include ankle sprains, achilles injuries or even to take pressure off an ulcerated area of the foot.
  • The time required for each individual will vary however a typical injury may result in needing to wear the Cam Walker for 2-8 weeks.

Did you know??

  • As the boot has a thick sole, this often leads to symptoms in the back or hips.
  • We will provide you with an ‘Even-up’, which aims to help level you up in order to reduce the chance of further problems.

Important to know

  • As the Cam Walker’s sole purpose is to reduce movement at the time of injury to allow for healing, it is extremely important that proper rehabilitation follows this stage.
  • Your Podiatrist will guide you towards a suitable management plan, to help reduce chance of future complications.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

IS YOUR TINY DANCER GOING EN POINTE?

Pre-Pointe Assessment

A specific pre-pointe assessment is recommended before a dancer progresses to pointe work.

The screening will help develop an awareness about correct and incorrect positions which will help the dancer on her/his pathway to going en pointe.

During a pre-pointe assessment, the following is taken into consideration:

  • Foot, ankle and leg strength
  • Joint range
  • Posture and core control
  • Anatomical structure of the foot and compensations
  • Growth and maturity

Once a pre-pointe dancer can correctly perform the assessments, she or he is strong enough to commence pointe work with the guidance from the ballet teacher.
The follow up review helps the dancer improve their strength and mobility for pointe work.

A review every six months is recommended if there are no concerns along the way.

Call our friendly reception team to book your tiny dancer in for a pre-pointe assessment today 5223 1531

OUR PAEDIATRIC CLINIC IS BACK!

SECURE YOUR APPOINTMENT FOR JUNE 2020 ~ call 5223 1531

  • 15 minute assessment with one of our expert podiatrists
  • Held on the last Wednesday of every month
  • Age limit ~ 6 years old and under
  • During Covid-19 we are asking that only 1 carer attends appointments
  • Please arrive on time to help our paediatric clinic run on time
  • Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed
  • Call 5223 1531 today!

 

FEET AND ANKLE INJURY FREE -WHILST SMASHING OUT HIIT SESSIONS

Due to the nature of HIIT (high intensity interval training), certain stresses may be placed on the feet and ankles, especially if this is a new form of exercise for you.

It is important to build the strength in your legs prior to engaging in HIIT training, as movements are often rapid and repetitious. It can place excessive pressure on your joints if your HIIT workouts are too frequent, and you do ‘too much too soon’, like many other activities. There are specific modifications that your trainer may be able to suggest if you have any concerns. Correct technique is crucial, so it is necessary for you and your trainer to be on top of this, to avoid injury.
Should you develop an injury, seek medical advice as soon as possible.

Be sure to wear appropriate footwear. When buying athletic footwear for your HIIT workout, stick with a ‘neutral’ shoe, unless it has been otherwise suggested by your health professional.
The shoe should have a firm heel counter (doesn’t fold right down if you try to push it with your fingers). The shoe should have a moderate amount of cushioning (without it being too heavy), for good shock attenuation to reduce the amount of force on the feet and legs. The softer the outer sole however, the faster it will compress, which we want to avoid.

If you do not feel as you are being adequately ‘supported’ or have enough cushioning, try altering your footwear. If this doesn’t change anything, there may be other things that your Podiatrist can manage or educate you with.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.