Posts

HOW MANY PHALANGES DOES A HUMAN HAVE?

56 phalanges!

There are 56 phalanges (bones) in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two. 
The phalanges of the fingers help us manipulate our environment while the phalanges of the foot help us balance, walk, and run.

Phalanges have many attachments such as muscles (via tendons), ligaments and other soft tissue.

Treatment of Toe Fractures

Fractures of the toe bones are almost always traumatic fractures. Treatment for traumatic fractures depends on the break itself and may include these options:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is all that is needed to treat a traumatic fracture of the toe.
  • Splinting. The toe may be fitted with a splint to keep it in a fixed position.
  • Rigid or stiff-soled shoe. Wearing a stiff-soled shoe protects the toe and helps keep it properly positioned. Use of a postoperative shoe or bootwalker is also helpful.
  • Buddy taping the fractured toe to another toe is sometimes appropriate, but in other cases, it may be harmful.
  • Surgery. If the break is badly displaced or if the joint is affected, surgery may be necessary. Surgery often involves the use of fixation devices, such as pins

Consequences of Improper Treatment

Some people say that “the doctor can’t do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is usually not true. In fact, if a fractured toe or metatarsal bone is not treated correctly, serious complications may develop. For example:

  • A deformity in the bony architecture, which may limit the ability to move the foot or cause difficulty in fitting shoes.
  • Arthritis, which may be caused by a fracture in a joint (the juncture where two bones meet), or may be a result of angular deformities that develop when a displaced fracture is severe or has not been properly corrected.
  • Chronic pain and deformity.
  • Non-union, or failure to heal, can lead to subsequent surgery or chronic pain.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

 

 

DIABETES AND HEATERS

Diabetes and heaters

Over time, diabetes may affect the blood vessels and nerves in your feet. This results in reduced or loss of protective sensations in the feet. 

One of these sensations is the body’s ability to detect changes in temperature and specifically if it is too hot or cold. The body may also have more difficulty in sweat regulation of the skin. 

For these reasons, heaters can become a danger risk. The body may not be able to detect the skin overheating and a burn may occur. For this reason, the following step should be followed:

  • Check the distance of your feet to the heater and assess if it may be too hot (do not sit close to the heater or fire)
  • Check your feet regularly for any changes to the skin and check the temperature of your toes and sole of the foot
  • Avoid sitting with your feet by the fire/heater
  • Avoid setting the car heater vents toward the feet

COLD WEATHER AND YOUR FEET!

Cold weather and your feet

During winter you may find your feet feeling colder and colder. It is important to do what you can to help your body climatize to the extreme colds.

What to do?

  • Wear weather appropriate clothing
  • Avoid walking barefoot on cold surfaces
  • Wear enclosed shoes
  • Try to wear natural fibre socks

Remember:

  • Do not expose your skin to extreme changes in temperature. The body takes time to properly adjust, quick changes may cause irritation or pain to the area as the body is unable to keep up.
  • Check the temperature of the water before entering the shower or bath, ensure it is not too hot.
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

COLD FEET? Diabetes Awareness Week 2020

Increasing blood flow to lower limbs

What to do?

  • Low level impact exercise, walking is great!
  • Keeping warm
  • Breaking up periods of inactivity with a short walk or low impact leg exercises 
  • Regular visits to your local podiatrist for assessment of blood flow.
  • If you have any concerns regarding your blood flow, it is always important to check with your GP

Avoid any television gimmicks, these rarely work and are often not backed up with research.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

CURLY OR OVERLAPPING TOES???

UNDERLAPPING, OVERLAPPING OR VARUS TOES

Characteristics
The toes stay in a flexed position with rotation towards the centre of the foot.
Curly toes are theorised to be caused by the muscles tightening and leading to the toes to buckle at the joint and stay in a flexed or curled position.
Curly toes are often genetic and can affect the 3rd, 4th and 5th toes. 

Curly toes develop before birth and do not usually express symptoms.
32.6 out of 1000 have curly toes as a child with 25-50% spontaneously resolve by age six.

Associated Symptoms

  • Nails on affected toes may become shortened, thickened and/or flattened.
  • Blisters, callus or corns may develop on the affected toes due to pressure.  

Treatment Options

  • Managing symptoms. 
  • Footwear recommendations. 
  • Tapping the overlapping and underlapping toes together in infants.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

DIABETES WEEK 12-18th of July 2020

DIABETES

Why are the feet affected?

  • Due to the small size of the blood vessels and distance away from the heart, the feet are most commonly among the 1st to be affected.

Main complications are:

  • Neuropathy (decreased sensation in the feet and symptoms such as burning or tingling)
  • Vascular disease (diabetes affects the bodys ability to maintain healthy blood vessel walls)
  • Infection (the body has a decreased ability to fight bacteria and disease)

Other complications:

  • Changes to foot structure creating areas of high load
  • Changes to the skin and sweating regulation
  • Decreased sensation and reduced balance

Where podiatry fits in:

  • We conduct an annual assessment (or more regular if required) which investigates and monitors changes in
    • Blood flow
    • Nerve sensitivity
    • Foot structure
    • Areas of high load
  • We can provide tailored treatment which may include
    • Nail care
    • Callus reduction
    • Orthotics
    • Footwear recommendations
    • Review of activities
    • Referrals to include a multi-disciplinary and whole body approach to care

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

EVERY 20 SECONDS SOMEWHERE IN THE WORLD SOMEONE LOSES A LEG DUE TO THE COMPLICATIONS OF DIABETES

Diabetes Awareness

Every 20 seconds somewhere in the world someone loses a leg due to the complications of diabetes

WHAT RISK STATUS ARE YOU?

CATEGORY  ULCER RISK  SCREENING/FOOT CHECK 
0 Very low  Once per year 
Low  Once every 6  – 12 months 
2 Moderate  Once every 3 – 6 months 
High  Once every 1 – 3 months 

 

Understanding and being accountable for your foot health is crucial to your overall health if you are a person that suffers diabetes. When you see your podiatrist for a diabetes assessment, they will help fill any gaps in your knowledge about the risks diabetes has on your feet, which can assist you in taking the best care and precautions for your feet. Did you know that the best way to minimise complications from diabetes is being aware of them? This way you can take the necessary steps in reducing complications. Book in to see your podiatrist today for a diabetic foot screen. 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR NEXT VISIT

Are your feet happier after visiting one of our expert podiatrists?

Would you like to receive 10% off your next visit? 

Take a moment to like us and write a review on our face book page and receive 10% off your next visit with us ( you can even do this whilst in our waiting room!)

To claim your 10% please show are staff at the front desk during payment your like and review