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PLANTAR FASCIOPATHY – PLANTAR FASCIITIS – PLANTAR HEEL PAIN

Plantar fasciopathy

  • Also known as plantar fasciitis, plantar fasciosis or plantar heel pain.

Refers to dysfunction of the plantar fascia (or plantar aponeurosis) under the foot. It is a connective tissue which connects the heel to the toes. The tissue may thicken, tear or become inflamed from overloading.

Symptoms

  • Pain under the arch of the foot. Most often ‘first step’ pain which occurs in the morning or after rest.
  • Can occur gradually over time or from an acute injury

Risk factors

  • High BMI
  • Reduced ankle range of motion
  • Foot structure
  • Occupation: jobs involving a lot of time standing

Treatment

  • Biomechanical assessment
  • Offloading with taping or orthotics
  • Footwear recommendations
  • Pain relief 
  • Activity modifications
  • THOR low level laser treatment to help reduce inflammation
  • Stretches

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

 

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

‘W’ SITTING – WHAT IS IT & WHY SHOULD I CORRECT IT?

W-Sitting

‘W-Sitting’ is where a child sits on the floor with their knees out forward and their legs splayed outwards to replicate a ‘W’. During their young age, sitting positions and activities will play a large role in the development of their lower limbs. ‘W-sitting’ particularly affects the hips and surrounding soft tissue such as ligaments and muscles.

This position encourages internal rotation of the hips and loosening these soft tissues to maintain this posture. These changes may also alter the child’s walking pattern. Internally rotated hips may result in a ‘pigeon-toed’ or with ‘knees pointing inwards’ while the child walks. The child may experience clumsiness, fatigue or lack of confidence in their walking and during sports. 

What can we do about it?
Encourage proper seating postures such as sitting ‘crossed legged’, this position externally rotates the legs and allows for proper development.  As well as doing activities which strengthen posterior muscles (such as the gluteals) are encouraged.

If your child experiences these symptoms, an assessment with a podiatrist may be required.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

ANKLE INJURIES/SPRAINS – Symptoms & Treatment

Ankle Injuries/Sprains

An ankle sprain may relate to ligament damage to the medial (inside), lateral (outside) or syndesmosis (‘high ankle sprain’) of the ankle. 

Sprains result from over-extension joint, putting high levels of load through the ligaments to resist these forces. Most commonly these injuries will occur during high impact activity with different sports carrying higher risk for some injuries. 

Symptoms

  • Pain on weightbearing 
  • Swelling/bruising 
  • Pain on palpation

Treatment

  • RICE (Rest, ice, compress and elevate) for the first 24 hours 
  • Activity modification
  • Medical imaging may be required to investigate and rule out other injuries such as a fracture
  • Offloading
    • Taping
    • Ankle braces
    • Moonboot/post-op shoe
    • Orthotics
    • Laser treatment

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

HOW MANY PHALANGES DOES A HUMAN HAVE?

56 phalanges!

There are 56 phalanges (bones) in the human body, with fourteen on each hand and foot. Three phalanges are present on each finger and toe, with the exception of the thumb and large toe, which possess only two. 
The phalanges of the fingers help us manipulate our environment while the phalanges of the foot help us balance, walk, and run.

Phalanges have many attachments such as muscles (via tendons), ligaments and other soft tissue.

Treatment of Toe Fractures

Fractures of the toe bones are almost always traumatic fractures. Treatment for traumatic fractures depends on the break itself and may include these options:

  • Rest. Sometimes rest is all that is needed to treat a traumatic fracture of the toe.
  • Splinting. The toe may be fitted with a splint to keep it in a fixed position.
  • Rigid or stiff-soled shoe. Wearing a stiff-soled shoe protects the toe and helps keep it properly positioned. Use of a postoperative shoe or bootwalker is also helpful.
  • Buddy taping the fractured toe to another toe is sometimes appropriate, but in other cases, it may be harmful.
  • Surgery. If the break is badly displaced or if the joint is affected, surgery may be necessary. Surgery often involves the use of fixation devices, such as pins

Consequences of Improper Treatment

Some people say that “the doctor can’t do anything for a broken bone in the foot.” This is usually not true. In fact, if a fractured toe or metatarsal bone is not treated correctly, serious complications may develop. For example:

  • A deformity in the bony architecture, which may limit the ability to move the foot or cause difficulty in fitting shoes.
  • Arthritis, which may be caused by a fracture in a joint (the juncture where two bones meet), or may be a result of angular deformities that develop when a displaced fracture is severe or has not been properly corrected.
  • Chronic pain and deformity.
  • Non-union, or failure to heal, can lead to subsequent surgery or chronic pain.

If in doubt please call us today for an appointment with one of our podiatrists on 5223 1531

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

 

 

 

SHIN SPLINTS AFFECTING YOUR RUN OR HIIT?

Shin Splints or MTSS or Medial tibial stress syndrome

Common in runners or those participating in running based sports

Symptoms:

  • Diffuse pain along the distal third of the tibia
  • Must be distinguished from focused pain which suggests a fracture or pain in the muscle compartments

Causes:

  • Large loads on the tibia causing strain on the surrounding soft tissues
  • Current evidence indicates that there may be bending of the tibia involved

Treatment

  • Activity modification
  • THOR Laser to address areas of inflammation and/or muscle trigger points
  • Orthotics which will provide offloading and reduce strain on the tibia
  • Footwear recommendations
  • Muscle stretches and/or strengthening

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

NAIL POLISH – YES OR NO? Read our latest blog for a solution if you said yes!

Nail Polish

Did you know that your nails are porous and they absorb what you put onto them?

Many nail polishes contain ingredients that are listed as POISONOUS. Some are listed as carcinogens and others have been linked to birth defects and breathing issues!

Why don’t we recommend it?

Nail polish can invite fungal growth to the nail. It creates a barrier which locks in pathogens and creates a protective layer. It also makes it difficult to spot changes in the nail and early signs of a fungal infection. Fungal nail infections can be very difficult to remove and we recommend taking steps to reduce your risk.

If you want to wear it, what should you do?

  • Thoroughly remove the current coat of nail polish before applying a new layer
  • Allow some time for you nail to ‘breath’ before a new layer, this allows the nail to rebuild lost oils
  • When removing layers, watch for signs of fungal nail infection such as changes in colour or thickness
  • Watch for any irritation or reaction from the nail polish to the surrounding skin. If you find a brand your skin can tolerate, try to stay with the same one to reduce the risk of a reaction occurring
  • We highly recommend FRANKIE4’s Safe 7 – a nail polish developed at Salon Standard without those scary ingredients!

For more info check out https://frankie4.com.au/shop/nail-polish.html

 

DIABETES AND HEATERS

Diabetes and heaters

Over time, diabetes may affect the blood vessels and nerves in your feet. This results in reduced or loss of protective sensations in the feet. 

One of these sensations is the body’s ability to detect changes in temperature and specifically if it is too hot or cold. The body may also have more difficulty in sweat regulation of the skin. 

For these reasons, heaters can become a danger risk. The body may not be able to detect the skin overheating and a burn may occur. For this reason, the following step should be followed:

  • Check the distance of your feet to the heater and assess if it may be too hot (do not sit close to the heater or fire)
  • Check your feet regularly for any changes to the skin and check the temperature of your toes and sole of the foot
  • Avoid sitting with your feet by the fire/heater
  • Avoid setting the car heater vents toward the feet

COLD WEATHER AND YOUR FEET!

Cold weather and your feet

During winter you may find your feet feeling colder and colder. It is important to do what you can to help your body climatize to the extreme colds.

What to do?

  • Wear weather appropriate clothing
  • Avoid walking barefoot on cold surfaces
  • Wear enclosed shoes
  • Try to wear natural fibre socks

Remember:

  • Do not expose your skin to extreme changes in temperature. The body takes time to properly adjust, quick changes may cause irritation or pain to the area as the body is unable to keep up.
  • Check the temperature of the water before entering the shower or bath, ensure it is not too hot.
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

COLD FEET? Diabetes Awareness Week 2020

Increasing blood flow to lower limbs

What to do?

  • Low level impact exercise, walking is great!
  • Keeping warm
  • Breaking up periods of inactivity with a short walk or low impact leg exercises 
  • Regular visits to your local podiatrist for assessment of blood flow.
  • If you have any concerns regarding your blood flow, it is always important to check with your GP

Avoid any television gimmicks, these rarely work and are often not backed up with research.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

TOTTENHAM LEGEND GARY MABBUTT HAS FOOT EATEN BY RAT

A FORMER English football international won’t be rushing onto the field any time soon after a horrifying incident on holidays in Africa.

IT’S hard to imagine a worse way to wake up than catching a rat eating your foot.

Unfortunately for Tottenham legend Gary Mabbutt, the nightmare became a reality while on a safari in South Africa.

The 57-year-old woke to find his bed covered in blood and severe damage to his foot after the horrific incident at Kruger National Park in South Africa.

Astoundingly, Mabbut claimed he couldn’t feel the rat chowing down on his toes due to a long career in football and type 1 diabetes.

Mabbutt, who played 16 matches for England, was rushed home for treatment following the incident six weeks ago.

“Unfortunately, due to the injuries through my career and having diabetes — I have very little feeling in my feet,” he told BBC Radio Live5.

“So I’ve gone to sleep and during the night a rat has come into the bedroom, climbed into the bed and decided to chew on my foot.

“It made quite a big hole in my toe going down to the bone and ate underneath my foot so it became infected.

“I then got home quite quickly and I was in hospital for a week and that was about, crikey, about six weeks ago now.”