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FREE PRE POINTE ASSESSMENTS NOW AVAILABLE FOR DANCE STUDIOS

Total Care Podiatry podiatrists Rachel Vale and Paul Graham assisting dancers from @bellarinedance preparing to progress to pointe with one of our free pre pointe assessment nights.
We offer a pre pointe assessment free to all dance studios in the Geelong, Bellarine and Surfcoast shires.
For more information please contact our clinic on ☎️ 5223 1531 or email frontdesk@totalcarepodiatry.com.au
So excited for these tiny dancers progressing to pointe!

WHICH SHOES TO WEAR WHEN YOU TRAVEL?

During travel it is most likely you will walk a lot more than usual.

Shoes that hold your foot in at the heel will reduce the amount of work your muscles will have to do as you are walking and reduce the risk of fatigue. For this and many other reasons, we recommend a good pair of sneakers. They also provide support and protection during your travels. Be sure to assess your current shoes for wear and tear. Most commonly, a shoe will need to be replaced after 18-24 months.

How to tell if you need new shoes:

  • Is the tread worn on the bottom of the shoe?
  • Is the sole pulling away from the shoe?
  • Is the lining tearing or looking worn?
  • Are they uncomfortable or make you feel unstable?

These might be signs that you need a new pair of shoes. If you decide you need a new pair of shoes, go to your local shoe store and follow these steps:

When buying:

  • Buy at the end of the day as your feet may swell slightly
  • Check are they appropriate how much walking you will do or the type of surface you will walk?
  • Try the shoes on for 5-10 minutes in the store to really understand if the fit is correct
  • Ensure the shoe feels good on the day, do not expect the shoes to “wear in”

How to fit the shoe:

  • Thumbs widths extra space from your big toe to the end of the shoe
  • The shoe doesn’t twist or bend at the midfoot
  • The shape, width and depth is correct for the shape for your toes

 

  • Are they orthotic friendly (if you wear these) or do you need a shoe which provide more support?

What to watch out for:

  • Any areas of rubbing or blisters from the shoe
  • Pain in the achilles tendon, under the arch or in the big toe
  • Do you feel unstable in the shoes?
  • Avoid elastic attachments as they will gradually loosen
  • Avoid the temptation of very soft/cushioned shoes as they are often very flexible and will not provide enough support for most foot types

If you want a second opinion or a more customised recommendation, see your local podiatrist.

If you do require new shoes it is most likely that good shoes are not cheap, but they will help you a lot during your holiday away.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

BLISTERS…why do they occur and prevention

Blisters form due to repetitive friction and trauma to the skin.

They are most commonly caused by rubbing or friction from footwear applying pressure to the foot and overloading the soft tissue during activity.A blister forms as a clear fluid filled lesion within the outer layers of the skin.

What to do:
– If the blister is closed; keep the blister protected (with a dressing), do not ‘pop’ the blister and reduce activity/change footwear.
– If the blister opens, apply antiseptic (e.g. betadine) to the area and a dressing. Reduce activity and monitor the blister for signs of infection. If any signs of infection occur contact your doctor.

Prevention

  • Appropriate shoe fit and style
  • Double layered socks and/or moisture wicking socks
  • Tapes/dressings
  • Paddings
  • Lubricant

Long term treatment

  • Footwear change
  • Biomechanical assessment to investigate areas of high pressure
  • Sock choice
  • Activity modification
THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

SKIP A STEP & SAVE MONEY…do I need to see my GP or Podiatrist for a foot complaint?

Podiatry

A podiatrist is an Allied health professional in foot care. Podiatrists help people in the care of their lower limbs including the foot and ankle and may also be involved in supporting older people to reduce their risk of falling.

They can treat conditions such as toe fungus, ingrown toenails, corns, calluses, bunions, infections and foot injuries. Podiatrists can perform ingrown toenail surgery using a local anaesthetic.

Where do podiatrists practice?

Podiatrists mainly work in private practices but also work in a range of health settings including hospitals, aged care, sports clinics and research and policy organisations.

When should I see a podiatrist?

There are a wide range of reasons to see a podiatrist but some typical foot conditions include heel pain, bunions, ingrown toenails, tinea, plantar warts, corns and calluses.  Some typical examples of why someone might see a podiatrist are:

  • Patient with diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, or neuropathy
  • Clinical diagnosis or history of foot or lower limb deformity
  • Clinical diagnosis of falls
  • Arthritis
  • Soft tissue and muscular pathologies
  • Circulatory diseases.

What services do podiatrists provide?

Podiatrists provide a wide range of services from the treatment of calluses to the treatment of bone and joint disorders. For conditions such as recurring sprains and chronic pain, podiatrists may prescribe foot orthoses.

The podiatrist’s scope of practice includes areas such as paediatrics, diabetes, sports injuries, structural problems, treatment of the elderly as well as general foot care.

Podiatrists with additional qualifications and registration may also perform foot surgery.

How are podiatrists qualified?

In order to practice in Australia, a podiatrist must complete the following:

  • A Bachelor of Podiatry
  • Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA)
  • Continuing professional development.

Skip a step and make a direct booking with one of our qualified podiatrists today on 5223 1531 

DON’T MISS OUT! our ‘JULY FREE PAEDIATRIC CLINIC’ IS BOOKING FAST

SECURE YOUR APPOINTMENT FOR JULY 2020 ~ call 5223 1531

  • 15 minute assessment with one of our expert podiatrists
  • Held on the last Wednesday of every month
  • Age limit ~ 6 years old and under
  • During Covid-19 we are asking that only 1 carer attends appointments
  • Please arrive on time to help our paediatric clinic run on time
  • Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed
  • Call 5223 1531 today!

DOES YOUR CHILD EXPERIENCE HEEL PAIN? Read our ‘SEVERS DISEASE’ blog for more information!

Sever’s Disease is rear foot pain and/or ankle pain as a result of inflammation of the growth plate of the heel bone in children. The heel pain is often localized around the back of the heel. This condition most commonly affects children between the ages of 8 to 14 years. This type of condition commonly occurs in those children who are very active with sport.

What are the most common problems with sever’s disease?

Affected children will complain of pain in the rear of the foot which may impact upon their ability to run, play and/or participate in sport.

How do these problems arise?

The cause of the pain in Sever’s Disease is thought to be the tractional forces applied to the growth plate of the heel bone, the achilles tendon and the plantar fascia.

How can they be treated?

The good news is that this heel pain in children is very simple to treat and children usually respond very quickly once treatment of Sever’s Disease commences.

Treatment of Sever’s Disease usually involves a combination of ice therapy, activity review and/or modification, review of training surfaces, exercises, footwear review and orthotic inserts where foot function is causing excessive traction on the heel growth plate.

When should they be checked by a podiatrist?

In order to reduce pain and limit the effect Sever’s disease has on your child’s everyday life, it is advised that you consult a Podiatrist for assessment and specific treatment plan.

How can Total Care Podiatry help you?

At Total Care Podiatry, we can tailor a treatment plan which is specific to your child’s individual needs and activities in order to achieve the best possible outcomes.

Contact our friendly reception staff on 5223 1531 today to secure your appointment

WARNING

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

OUR FREE FAMILY FOOT CLINIC RETURNS ~ 2nd of July 2020

Free family foot clinic!

THURSDAY 2nd of July 2020

15 minute FREE consultation 

Please arrive on time to help our family clinic run on time

Gold coin donation to ‘Kids plus foundation’ is welcomed

Call our friendly reception staff today to secure your appointment PH: 5223 1531

 

DO YOU NEED A CAM WALKER? AKA MOON BOOT

What is it?

  • The sole purpose of a Cam Walker, commonly known as a ’’moon boot’’ is to limit mobility in the foot and ankle.

Type of injuries?/How long?

  • You may be temporarily prescribed a cam walker by your Podiatrist if you have an acute or chronic injury that needs rest for a period of time, but still allows you to walk. Examples of injuries could include ankle sprains, achilles injuries or even to take pressure off an ulcerated area of the foot.
  • The time required for each individual will vary however a typical injury may result in needing to wear the Cam Walker for 2-8 weeks.

Did you know??

  • As the boot has a thick sole, this often leads to symptoms in the back or hips.
  • We will provide you with an ‘Even-up’, which aims to help level you up in order to reduce the chance of further problems.

Important to know

  • As the Cam Walker’s sole purpose is to reduce movement at the time of injury to allow for healing, it is extremely important that proper rehabilitation follows this stage.
  • Your Podiatrist will guide you towards a suitable management plan, to help reduce chance of future complications.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.

IS YOUR TINY DANCER GOING EN POINTE?

Pre-Pointe Assessment

A specific pre-pointe assessment is recommended before a dancer progresses to pointe work.

The screening will help develop an awareness about correct and incorrect positions which will help the dancer on her/his pathway to going en pointe.

During a pre-pointe assessment, the following is taken into consideration:

  • Foot, ankle and leg strength
  • Joint range
  • Posture and core control
  • Anatomical structure of the foot and compensations
  • Growth and maturity

Once a pre-pointe dancer can correctly perform the assessments, she or he is strong enough to commence pointe work with the guidance from the ballet teacher.
The follow up review helps the dancer improve their strength and mobility for pointe work.

A review every six months is recommended if there are no concerns along the way.

Call our friendly reception team to book your tiny dancer in for a pre-pointe assessment today 5223 1531

TOP TIPS FOR FEET FOR TRAIL RUNNING

There are a few things to consider if you enjoy trail running.

Skin integrity
This may include blisters, callous, corns and dry skin.
To help prevent these from developing, wear appropriate socks.  The best material is predominantly polyester, as this transfers or wicks moisturise away from the skin. This keeps the skin strong and dry, less likely to cause blisters. You can also wear two pairs of socks(to reduce friction); one very thin, without any creases but stretches around the foot and the second pair worn on top, a bit more cushioned. Wearing two pairs creates a barrier, meaning that if there is any friction, it more likely to occur inbetween the two socks rather than directly to the skin.
You may require specific padding to redistribute pressure points in the feet.

Skin and nail preparation
Cut your nails (not too short and not the day before your run)
Moisturise your feet daily to prevent skin irritation from stress. Apply everywhere except inbetween the toes as we want to keep these areas dry. Use a quality urea-based cream.
Address callous and cracked skin if you are not able to manage this.

Footwear
Make sure that you have a well-fitted pair of trail shoes (a cushioned runner with appropriate grip)
Make sure you have a little room in the shoe, if the feet begin to swell. Ability to adjust lace-technique if signs of swelling and pressure from shoes occur is also important.

If you have any lower leg or foot injuries, your risk of injury may be heightened due to the possible uneven trail surfaces.  You may require taping or further advice from your Podiatrist.

THIS INFORMATION IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO REPLACE PROFESSIONAL PODIATRIC ADVICE. TREATMENT WILL VARY BETWEEN INDIVIDUALS DEPENDING UPON YOUR DIAGNOSIS AND PRESENTING COMPLAINT. AN ACCURATE DIAGNOSIS CAN ONLY BE MADE FOLLOWING PERSONAL CONSULTATION WITH A PODIATRIST.